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    Area plans used for all floor plans?

    Recently I've changed jobs from single-family to multifamily. The company is relatively new at using Revit and I'm new to working on larger projects. I am starting to take on the BIM manager role.

    Because of the custom way they/we do areas, they do not want to use Room Tags w/ areas. They like their plans to show the area for the unit and do not like to use Room tags at all. They think because Revit is calculating the areas/volumes that it will slow the model down when you have hundreds of rooms. Another reason for not using rooms is because they do not want to see Room Separation lines all over.

    I don't think it's a good idea, I don't like seeing all plans as area plans, but I'm not entirely sure how to respond... Do you guys have any brilliant thoughts or ideas? Thanks.

    #2
    We do large multi story multi family. We use rooms for rooms, and we place rooms in every room. There aren't room boundary lines everywhere. We use area plans for FAR, FHA, and gross building calculations. They serve entirely different purposes. Using area plans as floor plans..... yuck.
    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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      #3
      There are several posts on combining units to report the way you are looking for them to behave. I don't have links offhand but if you search for it they should pop up.
      Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


      chad
      BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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        #4
        Originally posted by joeyd View Post
        They think because Revit is calculating the areas/volumes that it will slow the model down when you have hundreds of rooms.
        The alternative to having Revit calculate the areas/volumes would be for you (or someone on the staff) do them manually. So do they think THAT will be faster? I forsee LOTS of problems there.
        • What happens when someone moves a wall and doesn't tell the person that keeps track of these room sizes?
        • What happens when someone just flat miscalculates an area?


        I don't have any experience with large projects in Revit either. But would find it really hard to believe that having Revit calculate these numbers will slow the model any -- and just for arguments sake, let's say that it DOES make a big difference and while Revit is recalculating the areas, you're unable to work in the model. So you don't let Revit do those calculations. The time you saved will be spent manually updating the values yourself and then some.
        Don Ireland

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          #5
          To have any sort of room schedules, i.e. finish schedules and such, you will need to use rooms. They aren't going to slow down your model.

          As a side note, since it sounds like you are taking on the role of BIM Manager...in a company that is new to Revit, you are liable to have people who have no idea how Revit works or what it does, trying to direct you in how Revit should be managed. It can be the toughest part of being the BIM Manager. You have to be prepared.

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            #6
            Thanks for all of your input.

            We do large multi story multi family. We use rooms for rooms, and we place rooms in every room. There aren't room boundary lines everywhere. We use area plans for FAR, FHA, and gross building calculations. They serve entirely different purposes. Using area plans as floor plans..... yuck.
            Yeah, I wouldn't think Rooms would be an issue and area plans for everything is gross.

            There are several posts on combining units to report the way you are looking for them to behave. I don't have links offhand but if you search for it they should pop up.
            Now I am trying to research a better way and/or I need to convince them that they shouldn't do it the way they are.

            The alternative to having Revit calculate the areas/volumes would be for you (or someone on the staff) do them manually.
            At least they know that's a bad idea.

            ...people who have no idea how Revit works or what it does, trying to direct you in how Revit should be managed. It can be the toughest part of being the BIM Manager. You have to be prepared.
            I appreciate the heads-up. Time will tell if I'm up for the task... Some know enough to be dangerous. Dangerous in that they don't trust the new guy's reservations of how they do things, yet.

            The "funny" thing is that some of their families are overly complicated and that any alterations or reloading of them takes an extremely long time. (Some of which is due to my slow CPU.)

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              #7
              You can make the walls in your units not room bounding and change the room name to UNIT 1, 2,.... etc.

              That way you get your rooms, and they get their units.

              Have in mind that I have no idea what problems this may cause down the road. (Still think is better then the gross plan...)
              Would like the know what more experienced ppl think about this.
              Easy things are not worth the effort
              http://www.teamcad.rs/

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                #8
                Originally posted by joeyd View Post
                Yeah, I wouldn't think Rooms would be an issue and area plans for everything is gross.
                ...
                Now I am trying to research a better way and/or I need to convince them that they shouldn't do it the way they are.
                http://www.revitforum.org/architectu...html#post51094

                This method works well, although it takes some setup & management.
                Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                chad
                BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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                  #9
                  We do a lot of Health Care and that means hospitals with not hundreds, but thousands of Rooms.
                  No problem with "slowing down Revit" at all.
                  And, as far as Room Separation Lines showing up: that's what View Templates and View Filters are for.
                  We've got a whole set of what we call Coordination Views.
                  There is one set of Views (and View Templates) that go on Sheets.
                  Then there are other Views that you use only to work in.
                  One of those is what we call our Rooms View.
                  It's got nothing turned on except Walls, Columns, Doors, Room Separation Lines and Rooms with all the Room-subcategories turned on.
                  You can see at a glance where you've got unbounded and redundant Rooms & can easily clean things up without worrying about messing up your Sheet Views.
                  RoomSepView.PNG
                  Dave Plumb
                  BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

                  CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by joeyd View Post
                    Thanks for all of your input.

                    The "funny" thing is that some of their families are overly complicated and that any alterations or reloading of them takes an extremely long time. (Some of which is due to my slow CPU.)
                    Send them all a link to this thread. Tell them it's "required reading".
                    Don Ireland

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