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Project North vs True North.. what would you do?

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    Project North vs True North.. what would you do?

    Say you have a building that is long and skinny along a N/S axis and you want the plans to fit on the sheet horizontally (i.e. rotated 90 degrees) Do you:
    a) Rotate Project North 90 degrees so that your True North is pointing to the left
    or
    b) Rotate your viewport windows to achieve the same thing


    We're having some internal dialog here about the best approach..
    Ryan Taube
    BIM Manager - Clayco Construction | Lamar Johnson Collaborative

    #2
    Originally posted by ryntau View Post
    Say you have a building that is long and skinny along a N/S axis and you want the plans to fit on the sheet horizontally (i.e. rotated 90 degrees) Do you:
    a) Rotate Project North 90 degrees so that your True North is pointing to the left
    or
    b) Rotate your viewport windows to achieve the same thing


    We're having some internal dialog here about the best approach..
    I rotate the viewport. As a matter of fact in my business, for enlarged plans the exterior is Always down on the page so I rotate viewports a lot!
    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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      #3
      I would TOTALLY rotate Project North. Then you can have a Site Plan or solar study set to True North, and all of your Con Docs set to Project North. There are no down sides to doing it that way.

      Rotating every single crop region gets old, quick. Sure, you can tie them to Scope boxes and rotate the scope boxes... But let me ask you this: Whats the downside to using Project North correctly?
      Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
      @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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        #4
        That's what Project North was made for.

        I start all my plans oriented to best fit on paper using Project North and adjust True North as needed.
        Greg McDowell Jr
        about.me/GMcDowellJr

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          #5
          Originally posted by What he meant to say: GMcDowellJr
          That's what Project North was made for and why the stock templates are all set to Project North in all plan oriented views. START ALL PROJECTS oriented to best fit on paper using Project North. Adjust True North later as needed.
          I tweaked it so it says what you meant

          Well that's my perspective on it anyway.

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            #6
            Not trying to be a smart--- but the OP mentioned north pointing to the left...many years ago I started drafting as a part timer at the US Army Corps of Engineers and was told that north should always point to the TOP or the RIGHT, never to the bottom or the left. Not sure if there is such a thing as an industry standard anymore but I still follow that.

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              #7
              Originally posted by renogreen
              ...many years ago I started drafting as a part timer at the US Army Corps of Engineers and was told that north should always point to the TOP or the RIGHT...
              The notion of Project North certainly predates Revit or CAD in general. The building's shape generally helps determines which orientation is easiest to draw, put on paper. Then we place North arrows to indicate which direction is North in plan views. Revit allows us to define both and show either in a given view.

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                #8
                Originally posted by renogreen View Post
                ..and was told that north should always point to the TOP or the RIGHT, never to the bottom or the left.

                Never had a project yet that was better upside down but i suppose there's always a first time for everything!
                Last edited by Lkenshalo; December 8, 2014, 04:28 PM.
                The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by renogreen View Post
                  Not trying to be a smart--- but the OP mentioned north pointing to the left...many years ago I started drafting as a part timer at the US Army Corps of Engineers and was told that north should always point to the TOP or the RIGHT, never to the bottom or the left. Not sure if there is such a thing as an industry standard anymore but I still follow that.
                  Interesting. I was taught to make everything "right read"; meaning the bottom of the sheet, view, whatever is on the right when rotating. Thus a rotated north points left since on a 'normal' drawing north is up. Just about every architectural drawing I have ever seen uses this convention. But, wouldn't surprise me if the Corps has a different convention. And of course in the southern hemisphere it's usually south faces left, but they're upside-down.
                  For what it is worth, Revit does 'right read' automatically for elevations. If you only provide four directions in your elevation bubble family everything rotates counter clockwise until you hit 45 degrees, at which point the text rotates so the bottom of the text is to the right, and continues that way till 135 degrees, where the text flips back to bottom read, then it flips again at -45 degrees, and again at 45 degrees.

                  Gordon
                  Pragmatic Praxis

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Gordon Price View Post
                    And of course in the southern hemisphere it's usually south faces left, but they're upside-down.
                    Whaa???

                    Not ever in my 25+ year career have I seen any of the projects I've done in the south hemisphere not face North at least slightly upwards on the page. It's just that over here we tend to have most of the windows in a building towards the north façades (opposite of what you do in the north hemi, you know: since that's where most of our sun comes from).

                    Edit: Uh and even! You mean north facing slightly towards the right of upwards! Then I'm even less with you. I prefer it pointing left if I can, but there's another reason: You do tend to find that designing for optimal sunlight means the building's major façade tries to orient north, and as a second best option slightly east of north: I.e. to get some morning sun to heat up the place quicker after the cold night instead of heating it more in the late afternoon and leaving the morning frigid. So more often than not north would face slightly left instead of right on the page anyway - just because you design most building to suit the sun and the timing.

                    For the same reason I'd actually expect most north hemisphere projects to have TN facing slightly right instead.
                    Last edited by irneb; December 6, 2014, 01:16 PM.

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