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    How to convince your colleagues?

    For me the Revit program isn't the main problem (well, it has it's shortcomings, but what programs don't?), it's mainly the stubborness of some colleagues over here that I run in to.

    I work in a relative small department within the company, about 4,5 fulltime draftsmen, 3 project managers / advisors, 1 architect and me. The latter strolling a bit between the different specialisms, doing a bit of everything (sometimes too much, but in a strange way, an agenda filled with deadlines makes me more productive). One of my tasks for this year is the implementation of Revit Architecture throughout the office. That involves maintaining mainly the software and a tiny bit of hardware, keeping track of the different templates, families, worksets, all that jazz.

    Another part is to function as an internal helpdesk. And presto, there's the point. I have to convince the others that they start working in Revit. They all did a training or two, but the real experience should derive from the hands-on with RAC. But in a way, at this moment most of them won't. Why? Arguments vary from 'because I can work faster with that other program' to '@%%*&!!!#@' (lots of cursing). Luckily, one person (of which I thought the least in the beginning) is quite enthusiast, so it's not

    Maybe it's still too early, but my goal for this year would be that every person know how to make a decent drawing on paper. Trying to convince them into the dephts of BIM is way above their league, that goal is set for 2025 or so.

    What I've noticed at this forum it's guests work as widespread as from einzelgängers (no pun intended) to multi-office architectural and engineering companies. So, my final question is, how to make your colleagues more enthusiast and convince them to start using Revit? I'm curious, at this moment I don't have a solution at hand. Thanks in advance, first round of :coffee: is on me.
    Arjan Ikink, BIM-engineer at PHB Deventer
    LinkedIn

    #2
    Ask them if they want to do the work faster and better and have more fun doing it. It won't be any of those things at first - in fact it will be slower worse and more frustrating for the first project or two. But the investment will pay off over time. Oh. And your company might (probably) will be in a better or equal position relative to its competitors for delivering higher quality projects in less time. It is not easier, but its better - measurably.

    Its like walking on crutches after a broken ankle. If you don't ever put down the crutches, and endure a little pain and hardship in the short term, you will never be able to run long term. There is absolutely nothing that you can do the old way that you cannot do in Revit, and there are many important things you can do in Revit that you cannot do the old way - in a given amount of time. Just remind them kindly that survival is not mandatory.

    I would say from my own personal experience, that you will need someone in senior management who champions the effort and monitors, measures and enforces progress toward clear goals. People who cannot or will not make the effort to change must be left behind or re-purposed. For people who seek a higher quality project delivery process, Revit (BIM or VDC or whatever) sells itself. Those who are not truly interested in higher quality processes will always be walking on crutches.
    Last edited by jsnyder; June 10, 2011, 08:22 AM.

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      #3
      Learning Revit is also an investment in their own future - What happens if they don´t know Revit and get laid off by the company you are in now? How many hiring companies do NOT require at least basic Revit skills?

      Your co-workers should see this as an golden opportunity to get a indispensable knowledge upgrade - They would even get payed while getting the upgrade - If they wait till they get laid off, they´ll have to pay for the upgrade out of their own pockets.
      Klaus Munkholm
      "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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        #4
        Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
        How many hiring companies do NOT require at least basic Revit skills?
        In the UK, if you know the word Revit, you are an expert and will be hired instantly.
        Don't cry, don't raise your eye, it's only Revit wasteland.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
          Learning Revit is also an investment in their own future - What happens if they don´t know Revit and get laid off by the company you are in now? How many hiring companies do NOT require at least basic Revit skills?

          Your co-workers should see this as an golden opportunity to get a indispensable knowledge upgrade - They would even get payed while getting the upgrade - If they wait till they get laid off, they´ll have to pay for the upgrade out of their own pockets.
          I'm afraid this isn't really the current situation in Holland...
          Ikinks, what kind of projects do you do? Maybe I could be of some assistance? (being Dutch and having turned quite a few companies to the "Dark Side"...)
          Martijn de Riet
          Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
          MdR Advies
          Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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            #6
            I think it is pretty simple really.

            Once through the training period, the cost of which should not be under estimated, I make far few errors, produce high quality drawings, in less time and make more money! ROI Stacks up handsomely for Revit.
            Ian Kidston
            http://allextensions.com.au

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              #7
              Originally posted by ikinks View Post
              ... So, my final question is, how to make your colleagues more enthusiast and convince them to start using Revit? I'm curious, at this moment I don't have a solution at hand. ...
              Similar to what others have well said above, here's my 2 cents:

              1. Support from upper management. Even better, if management makes the use of Revit mandatory for the office, for all its advantages. Sometimes management needs to make things really serious: my boss in an office I was working at recently, got to a point where he had to tell the employees that whoever wanted to continue working in his office had to learn Revit, or leave. Yeah, they were reluctant before, but the next day, all of them were more than willing to cooperate. In other words, you don't have to convince your colleges. If management is convinced, it will definitely help in "convincing" the staff.

              2. There must be a leader, who helps people accomplish their goals and helps them if they get stuck at the most difficult tasks. This is the person who establishes strategies, policies, rules, etc. The leader is also a motivator who sets the bar high for quality.

              3. Show results, measure them and make people see the difference in time, output, quality, coordination, etc. Good results help to settle Revit for ever. In this office I am commenting about, I saw the most skeptical guys get totally converted into evangelists of Revit at the end, once they were able to finish their deadlines faster and better than before. Then they got pride in their work. Once they get that pride and confidence, they are converted and never want to go back to the old program.
              Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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                #8
                Well, that's some response! Happy to see I'm not the only one who dealt with such situations. In particular I like the metaphor given by jsnyder. Maybe I should launch that idea, especially since the architect here walks with those crutches due to a broken hip (told him so: don't go skiing in Austria - it'll kill you ).

                Making Revit mandatory was the intention from the very beginning of the implementation. Fact is that our license comes with Autocad and Acad Architecture, and that -despite the efforts of the early adopters- Acad still has the leading position being the most used and commonly accepted design program in Holland. Apparently, old habits die hard.

                So, time to make my mind up. Coming up in the next few weeks: some major modifications in my first project. Hopefully I can show them that altering the model works wááááy faster than drawing all the facades, floor maps and sections. Rock on! :bb:
                Arjan Ikink, BIM-engineer at PHB Deventer
                LinkedIn

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by mog505 View Post
                  In the UK, if you know the word Revit, you are an expert and will be hired instantly.
                  We have now learned that just because you say you know Revit, doesn't mean you know how to use Revit....which we got some interns that said that and we spend all of our time showing them how to use it. :/
                  Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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                    #10
                    Perhaps look at taking 2 people initially who are interested. Work with them and build up their skill and confidence. Once they start becoming confident they will join you in singing Revits benefits. Then move on to two more and you can use the first two to help up skill others with basics as well. Once people become comfortable with Revit they will get excited about it and those who resist will begin to feel left behind.
                    Pretty soon the balance will swing towards Revit.
                    They key is to have full upper management support as well.
                    Andrew Harp
                    BIM Manager GHD
                    If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
                    If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

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