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    Revit Component authoring using Revit LT?

    Can anyone advise as to the viability of using Revit LT 2014 for the production of RFA families- ie producing Revit Components on behalf of manufacturers?

    Specific questions I can think of so far are:-

    - Is the Family Editor exactly the same as in full revit. (Does it have the full range of modelling tools! Etc)

    -Does Revit LT ship with the same breadth of family templates as full revit

    -are the resultant RFA files produced in Revit LT, full compatible with full revit (I assume so, but thought I'd better make sure)

    -are there any limitations of family modelling in LT which will make it non-viable as an authoring tool- if I am looking to sell this authoring service to manufacturers?

    -I "think" I have read that LT doesn't support quite all the Categories that full Revit does??????

    -I also read that the materials editor does not support a couple of parameters (physical / thermal characteristics) that full revit does- in reality, is this going to be a significant limitation if I am looking to use LT to produce components for others?????

    So in short: If someone was looking to get into the business of producing revit family components for companies- is Revit LT up to this job?

    Many thanks,
    Regards,
    Ian


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

    #2
    Originally posted by IDN101 View Post
    Is the Family Editor exactly the same as in full revit. (Does it have the full range of modelling tools! Etc)
    Yes, it is the same family editor

    Originally posted by IDN101 View Post
    -Does Revit LT ship with the same breadth of family templates as full revit?
    Yes

    Originally posted by IDN101 View Post
    -are the resultant RFA files produced in Revit LT, full compatible with full revit (I assume so, but thought I'd better make sure)
    Yes

    Originally posted by IDN101 View Post
    -are there any limitations of family modelling in LT which will make it non-viable as an authoring tool- if I am looking to sell this authoring service to manufacturers?
    No

    Originally posted by IDN101 View Post
    -I "think" I have read that LT doesn't support quite all the Categories that full Revit does??????
    No, it supports all the categories

    Originally posted by IDN101 View Post
    -I also read that the materials editor does not support a couple of parameters (physical / thermal characteristics) that full revit does- in reality, is this going to be a significant limitation if I am looking to use LT to produce components for others?????
    AFAIK, the LT family editor supports all the same parameters. But i would have to confirm

    Originally posted by IDN101 View Post
    So in short: If someone was looking to get into the business of producing revit family components for companies- is Revit LT up to this job?
    Yes
    Scott D Davis
    Sr. AEC Technical Specialist
    Autodesk, Inc.
    http://bit.ly/aboutsdd

    Comment


      #3
      Many thanks Scott- Great info. Sounds like LT is a goer!

      Regards,
      Ian


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by IDN101
        So in short: If someone was looking to get into the business of producing revit family components for companies- is Revit LT up to this job?,,,
        NO.

        Originally posted by IDN101
        Sounds like LT is a goer!
        I don't think so. If you plan to get "into the business of producing Revit family components for companies", as you say, be aware that many of the families that you will be asked to do are for manufacturers of equipment, and parts and pieces, fixtures, not only manufactures of doors and windows; suppose that you need to create some pumps or tanks, or electrical panels, or lighting fixtures, or valves. How would you test any of these families to see if they will be useful for your clients, if you cannot test them because Revit LT cannot connect them to anything? There is a reason why LT is cheap: because it is limited. It cannot model conduit, pipe, duct, etc., and it cannot create systems of any kind.

        I would suggest you not to try to save money on the main tool of the business that you have in mind. Try to get the full Revit, and not only Revit Architecture, but the full "one box" Revit that comes with the 3 versions, Architecture, Structure, and MEP, the Suite, with a subscription, so that you can have access to download not only the current version of Revit but also the 2 previous versions. There are clients that still require families in formats that are two or more years behind. How would you do that with Revit LT? Don't limit yourself and your business with a limited software.
        Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Alfredo Medina View Post
          NO.


          I don't think so. If you plan to get "into the business of producing Revit family components for companies", as you say, be aware that many of the families that you will be asked to do are for manufacturers of equipment, and parts and pieces, fixtures, not only manufactures of doors and windows; suppose that you need to create some pumps or tanks, or electrical panels, or lighting fixtures, or valves. How would you test any of these families to see if they will be useful for your clients, if you cannot test them because Revit LT cannot connect them to anything? There is a reason why LT is cheap: because it is limited. It cannot model conduit, pipe, duct, etc., and it cannot create systems of any kind.

          I would suggest you not to try to save money on the main tool of the business that you have in mind. Try to get the full Revit, and not only Revit Architecture, but the full "one box" Revit that comes with the 3 versions, Architecture, Structure, and MEP, the Suite, with a subscription, so that you can have access to download not only the current version of Revit but also the 2 previous versions. There are clients that still require families in formats that are two or more years behind. How would you do that with Revit LT? Don't limit yourself and your business with a limited software.
          Many thanks for this advice Alfredo- very valid points indeed.

          I just have to be conscious of my capital outlay- at least for the first year until some sort of business is established.

          So Revit LT can "create" ANY of these families- it just does not have the full environment in order to test them?

          Regards,
          Ian


          Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Alfredo Medina View Post
            NO.


            I don't think so. If you plan to get "into the business of producing Revit family components for companies", as you say, be aware that many of the families that you will be asked to do are for manufacturers of equipment, and parts and pieces, fixtures, not only manufactures of doors and windows; suppose that you need to create some pumps or tanks, or electrical panels, or lighting fixtures, or valves. How would you test any of these families to see if they will be useful for your clients, if you cannot test them because Revit LT cannot connect them to anything? There is a reason why LT is cheap: because it is limited. It cannot model conduit, pipe, duct, etc., and it cannot create systems of any kind.

            I would suggest you not to try to save money on the main tool of the business that you have in mind. Try to get the full Revit, and not only Revit Architecture, but the full "one box" Revit that comes with the 3 versions, Architecture, Structure, and MEP, the Suite, with a subscription, so that you can have access to download not only the current version of Revit but also the 2 previous versions. There are clients that still require families in formats that are two or more years behind. How would you do that with Revit LT? Don't limit yourself and your business with a limited software.
            Alf is right when it comes to testing. Revit LT wont be able to test the families you make effectively, although it WILL be able to model these families. I'm part of our sales organization, and normally I'd be completely behind Alf....I want you to buy the full blown Revit package a a Suite, as ultimately it's a better "deal" for me personally.

            In this case, here's what I'd do:

            Get Revit LT for all of your family authoring/creation. THEN get the TRIAL version of full Revit in the Building Design Suite. Once the 30 day trial period is up, the program will continue to work in "trial" mode, which means you will be able to test your families as much as you want. You wont be able to save, export, or print from Trial Mode, but that should not matter as you wont need to "save" the test project.
            Scott D Davis
            Sr. AEC Technical Specialist
            Autodesk, Inc.
            http://bit.ly/aboutsdd

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Scott D Davis View Post
              Alf is right when it comes to testing. Revit LT wont be able to test the families you make effectively, although it WILL be able to model these families. I'm part of our sales organization, and normally I'd be completely behind Alf....I want you to buy the full blown Revit package a a Suite, as ultimately it's a better "deal" for me personally.

              In this case, here's what I'd do:

              Get Revit LT for all of your family authoring/creation. THEN get the TRIAL version of full Revit in the Building Design Suite. Once the 30 day trial period is up, the program will continue to work in "trial" mode, which means you will be able to test your families as much as you want. You wont be able to save, export, or print from Trial Mode, but that should not matter as you wont need to "save" the test project.
              I had forgotten about using it in Trial Mode for testing... Thats a great idea.

              I would go with this recommendation, except for Alf's point about content providers getting asked (in many cases) to build content in way older versions. Me personally, i think thats stupid, at which point i would go with Scotts suggestion. BUT, i dont work as a content creator, so i have the luxury of telling people to stuff it if they want something done in 2011. As a contract content builder, if you dont have the luxury, well...
              Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
              @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks Scott- really appreciate your honesty.

                This strategy did cross my mind and I think it's what I'll do certainly for the first year of trading.

                I am going to specialise in Revit Architecture, so LT makes sense for me- at least initially. I am aware of LT's limitations but the price differential is just too significant to ignore. I am going to specifically target non-MEP component manufacturers to start with- so I'll do this all within the LT environment.

                Just a couple of other questions about LT, if you'd be so kind as to answer:-

                If I take out an Autodesk Subscription at the time of purchase (which I'm planning to do)- does this give a set number of cloud render tokens???? Or is it unlimited?????
                I may also wish to offer a visualisation service- ie pretty pictures for architects / contractors- I realise LT won't render locally- but do I have to pay extra for each render I request in the cloud????

                Also:

                If after (say) 1 year of using LT, I decide to "upgrade" to a full version of Building Design Suite" to I get any sort of discount- as I am trading up from LT and I have a subscription?

                And finally:
                Can I use the plugins (from the Labs) with LT? I am interested in the COBie export utility and some others.

                Thanks once again.

                Regards,
                Ian

                Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Scott D Davis View Post
                  ...Get Revit LT for all of your family authoring/creation. THEN get the TRIAL version of full Revit in the Building Design Suite. Once the 30 day trial period is up, the program will continue to work in "trial" mode, which means you will be able to test your families as much as you want. You wont be able to save, export, or print from Trial Mode, but that should not matter as you wont need to "save" the test project.
                  I agree with Aaron in that this is a good idea; it is at least a good alternative to start with. I did not remember that a trial version could continue working after 30 days. Having the subscription of the Suite would be the ideal situation in the near future, but I understand that this might be difficult now. As as I said before, the OP must be very careful about the versions of the families. You don't want to build a set of families that works in your new Revit LT but does not work in the client's Revit Architecture 2013, Revit MEP 2012, or similar.

                  _________________________________________________

                  Edit: about some of the new questions, posted in the message above:
                  • No, you cannot upgrade from Revit LT to the full Revit.
                  • No, you cannot use add-ins/plug-ins in Revit LT.
                  Alfredo Medina
                  Forum Co-Founder
                  Last edited by Alfredo Medina; October 13, 2013, 08:57 PM.
                  Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by IDN101 View Post
                    If I take out an Autodesk Subscription at the time of purchase (which I'm planning to do)- does this give a set number of cloud render tokens???? Or is it unlimited?????

                    I may also wish to offer a visualisation service- ie pretty pictures for architects / contractors- I realise LT won't render locally- but do I have to pay extra for each render I request in the cloud????
                    You get "cloud credits" with your subscription which are good for rendering and other cloud enabled applications, like analysis. I believe you get 250 credits a year, and if you run out, you can buy more. The highest rendering "price" I've seen so far is 16 cloud credits, which was a 20-something megapixel image at "best" quality, to give you an idea on how far your credits will go. You can render "screen resolution" images all you want for free, to test your scene before you produce your final presentation render.


                    If after (say) 1 year of using LT, I decide to "upgrade" to a full version of Building Design Suite" to I get any sort of discount- as I am trading up from LT and I have a subscription?
                    Autodesk is always having promotions, and upgrades from lesser products to the Building Design Suite seem to be always offered. Ultimately it all depends on what promotions are being offered when you decide to upgrade. But historically, i would say yes, you will be able to upgrade. Also our resellers offer their own promotions as well.

                    Can I use the plugins (from the Labs) with LT? I am interested in the COBie export utility and some others.
                    No plug-ins for Revit LT, the API for the plug-ins does not exist in LT.
                    Scott D Davis
                    Sr. AEC Technical Specialist
                    Autodesk, Inc.
                    http://bit.ly/aboutsdd

                    Comment

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