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    #11
    Drew, what do you mean by set it all up? The door thickness?
    In that video, you just see 3 tables, because I was working in a separate DB file, with only those 3 tables linked to the exported RDBL file. I always do that because I only use a small percentage of all tables, and also because that way I keep the original file clean.
    Linking is very important, and for that reason I went do MS Access (OOffice only allows for 1 external file link). SQL server is also an option, but I don´t think it has report tools like ms access.
    Other stuff I also link is the revit keynote text file and additional databases with things like Manufacturer data and contacts.
    Some people like to put all that stuff inside revit parameters, but I keep all that outside. Things that are common to many projects should be kept outside revit, and one of the advantages is the possibility of being edited with simple tools like DB or excel: which means editing by other people than architects.
    The drag and drop in the query design is very intuitive and it´s all about the logic of relashionships. No manual for that.
    As for the rest, try playing around any DB. That´s the best way to learn.
    I have been doing that for the past 2 years and feels like I have just scratched the surface.
    Gonçalo Feio
    "Ignorance, ignorance, sheer ignorance - you know there's no confidence to equal it. It's only when you know something about a profession, I think, that you're timid and careful." George Orson Welles

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      #12
      Feio,

      I think what people want to know is how did you get it working on 64bits OS? Multiple people have not gotten it to work (even with the add-ons you linked to earlier). The option to export to Acces is just not there.

      Any steps you did before you could set it up?
      Attached Files

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        #13
        Originally posted by Bjorn_K View Post
        Feio,

        I think what people want to know is how did you get it working on 64bits OS? Multiple people have not gotten it to work (even with the add-ons you linked to earlier). The option to export to Acces is just not there.

        Any steps you did before you could set it up?
        have you tried it with Access 2010? I think that's the key. I couldn't get it to work with 2007 either and upgraded to 2010 but haven't had the time to dive back in yet
        I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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          #14
          Have tried 2010 and still doesn't show an available connection on 64 bits OS.

          Would love to hear how people got this working, colleague of mine has been in conversation with Support about this for a while, also with the 2010 Office/64 bits combo.

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            #15
            Originally posted by Bjorn_K View Post
            Have tried 2010 and still doesn't show an available connection on 64 bits OS.
            well, that's not good news
            I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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              #16
              You have to add a new connection on the ODBC Tab. Click Export and use the MachineDataSourceTab and select MS Access Database.
              - Peter -
              www.revitogbim.blogspot.com

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                #17
                My drivers for access / excel are Version 14.00.4760.1000File: ACEODBC.DLL from 3/22/2010.
                And like Peter said, You have to create a connection with the ODBC Data Source Admnistrator.
                But I usually use the System DSN and not machine data source like Peter.
                Gonçalo Feio
                "Ignorance, ignorance, sheer ignorance - you know there's no confidence to equal it. It's only when you know something about a profession, I think, that you're timid and careful." George Orson Welles

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                  #18
                  Originally posted by Bjorn_K View Post
                  Have tried 2010 and still doesn't show an available connection on 64 bits OS.

                  Would love to hear how people got this working, colleague of mine has been in conversation with Support about this for a while, also with the 2010 Office/64 bits combo.
                  I just want to comment that DBLink works for me using this combination: Win 7 64 bit computer + Revit Arch 2012 + Microsoft Access 2010. (Finally. Now I have to learn how to use it.)


                  Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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                    #19
                    I have posted step by step instructions in our blog:
                    http://blog.revitforum.org/2011/06/h...n-between.html

                    ... and the post has just been "fed" into our forum, in this other thread.
                    Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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                      #20
                      Using Revit with MS Access

                      I have used Revit with MS Access for several years including DB Link which was introduced with Revit 2009. If you are not using MS Access to update the Revit model, but only extracting information, you can export to ODBC and open the file with MS Access. If you want a 2-way link you will need to use DB Link. Exporting data is an order of magnitude faster than linking the Revit and Access files. MS Access must be installed on your system to export or link files and the version (32/64 bit) must match Revit.

                      Our projects tend to large to extremely large and cannot be worked on in 32 bit Revit due to memory limitations. You must have 64 bit ODBC drivers to link 64 bit Revit with MS Access. These became available with the introduction of MS Office 2010. When you install 2010 it defaults to the 32 bit version and does not give you the option (or even let you know there is an option) to install a 64 bit version. You must start the install from a separate 64 bit folder on the install disk. 64 bit Office is incompatible with 32 bit so you must install all Office programs as 64 bit if you want 64 bit MS Access. I have had it installed at work and home for over a year with no problems or compatibility issues except for legacy VBA code which I have been able to replace or update.

                      I used the export function on a 2 million SF project to manage furniture. The project was so large that it required 13 primary Revit files to represent the project. Space Types were stored as a room parameter in Revit. In MS Access each Space Type was assigned furniture components stored in the MS Access database including colors, finishes, descriptions, costs, photos, and other information. Multiplying the quantity of each Space Type times the quantity of each assigned component provided the means to create quantity take-offs and costs by room number, building, floor, and section. Full color furniture specifications catalogs with quantities and costs were printed from MS Access using the quantity data from Revit. When you export from Revit it automatically creates an .mdb or .accdb file at your option. I link the exported files to a master MS Access file that only links the tables that I need from the export. As long as the file name is the same you can update the exported file and the master file will also be updated. Best practice is to not overwrite when exporting but to export a new file and change the name to the linked file.

                      I used the DB Link function to create a pilot program to test furniture inventory management for a large international organization. Using furniture families from the project library I added existing furniture to three building with 6 to 13 floors each. The client provided a spreadsheet with the organizations located in each room from their CAFM software. I used DB Link to add the organization name and room occupant to Revit files and was able to create color-coded plans based on organization. I created detailed reports in MS Access to show the furniture quantities by room, floor, organization, manufacturer, and finish. When a group was planned to move, a Revit file for their new space allowed for a comparision of the furniture required for the new plan compared with the furniture available in the original plan. If there was a shortfall you could easily determine where in the buildings similar furniture was located and whether it could be used.

                      I would be very interested in hearing how other people have used MS Access with Revit. I think this is an area that will only grow in the future.

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