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    Need your advice on Revit

    I just joined this forum. I have about 10 yrs experience w autocadd. I used to work as a consultant for a small architectural firm which used only autocad. currently i am looking for fultime work, but from job advertisements in my area, every firm is looking for candidates with revit proficiency. I just feel like i am in a sinking boat. i am unemployed, already shedding my savings on ARE. Googled about revit came across bunch of online classes and some free videos on youtube too. I just dont want to learn some commands from 10000 youtube videos, would like to be able to apply to a project. I heard i can download a free trial revit software from autodesk. would like to draft my house plan for simplicity to begin with. Is there any videos to do this step by step floating around online. Has anybody here been in a similar situation and how did you get out of it. How do i sell myself to a prospective employer without having all the skills that he /she needs. Your advise and suggestions are highly appreciated.

    #2
    Hi there,
    I suggest you learn through Lynda.com. An excellent body of video classes that covers almost everything there is to know. The also have a step by step tutorials of building a project.
    good luck

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      #3
      From my perspective having recently interviewed quite a few prospects, your ability with Revit is important if that's what the job calls for, but the top of my list beyond that (and this is just my list of course). How good are you are drafting? How good are you at detailing? Do you have an eye for details, clash detection, finding and correcting errors? What's your knowledge of construction specific to my business? How quickly do you get the job done? How will you integrate with other team members in the office? I've seen a few who have flashy portfolios full of renders and modelling, but severely lacking in the actual important 'get the job done' type documentation. Funnily enough these are also usually the ones with their head in the clouds expecting so much in return.'Revit is the next big thing taking the world by storm and i'm at the head of the pack. yeah it's an absolutely fantastic tool, but these 'rare' skills won't remain so rare forever. Skill, experience and the right attitude is what employers want, it's up to you to undertand the tools provided.
      As long as you have a good internet connection and the desire to succeed you will find enough free instruction out there to keep you entertained for years. Download the trial software and jump straight in with your house plans. As long as you just make a start. There are countless articles here on revitforum so just start looking, blogs, YouTube, just even start googling. Start asking questions here, there are many users waiting to lend a hand. A good portion (the stuff that really matters!) of the Revit wiki help files point back here anyway. Revit has a very steep learning curve in the beginning, many (but not all) methodoligies vary greatly from Autocad so keep an open mind and positive attitude, because but one day it all just starts to click....
      There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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        #4
        Sorry in advance for any typos but I don't have time to proofread this before posting

        Not too long ago - just a few months - I was in your exact position but coming from a different . I have been in the graphic design field for 13 years and 3D design for 10. It has only been the last 3 years that I have been involved in the ArchViz industry - though it is not the only thing I do.

        I used to Model and animated everything in Cinema 4D. In C4D you model everything (you model a window you don't use a window family object etc...) Looking for a better/faster solution, and wanting to do more than make pretty pictures, I began to look to 3D CAD apps and chose the industry standard - Revit - which would mean abandoning my favorite app of all, C4D.

        I had never even launched a CAD program before a few months ago, and like you I researched the app with videos and PDFs and then I came here for advise. I bought the Infinite Skills Learning Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013 DVD. There are many out there and I chose this one because I felt like it was one I wouldn't fall asleep to. I have since outgrown these basics but the lessons gave me just enough basic understanding, to start playing around, and when I began to run into difficulty I came here. I find myself here a often.

        Check this guys Blog Ronen Bekerman's 3d Architectural Visualization Blog - The source for sharing & learning about all aspects of 3d architectural visualization good stuff here.

        At first I found it scary and it difficult to begin to use it on a real project. I kept falling back to what I know best, just to get the project done. Then the right project came along. Something that I felt I could handle and the deadline was one that I could deal with. Like elton said, the learning curve is steep at first and you smash your head against the desk because it wont do what you want it to do but when you begin to understand the rules of the game it does click. I am far from even thinking of saying that in a few months you will know Revit, but I can say that you will be able to use Revit with good success if you are will to stick with it and leave your crutch.

        Fortunately, I am self employed - which in a sense, you are too at the moment - and I do not solely depend on the construction industry to survive. I have a couple of architectural firms and local builders that keep me busy creating visualizations for them, but there is so much more to Revit and therefore many services to offer.

        If you are going to download the 30 day trial be ready to go at it hard. 30 days is just enough time to figure out if it will run on your computer and to get truly frustrated. If you have multiple computers or willing to uninstall and re-install you can get more evaluation time. But honestly, if you feel you can make a living working in Revit then don't hesitate. Jump right in and get going now. Being an employer, elton is spot on.

        Here is the last project I did with Revit and rendered in 3DS Max. Keep in mind I have never used a CAD app before October 2012. This project had a really tight deadline of 4 days and i was getting changes and a daily basis. This was also the second time I have used 3DS Max. You Can Do It! I hope this helps... Best of luck to you!

        111_Maplewood_Front_lowres.jpg 111_Maplewood_Back_lowres.jpg
        pixelforce
        Member
        Last edited by pixelforce; March 16, 2013, 05:52 PM.

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          #5
          Originally posted by sumarch View Post
          ... I just dont want to learn some commands from 10000 youtube videos, would like to be able to apply to a project. I heard i can download a free trial revit software from autodesk. would like to draft my house plan for simplicity to begin with. ...
          If I may say this, another alternative you might consider is online live training. I teach, in this way: 2 hours a day, 4 times a week. In 3 weeks you would have seen a course of 24 hours, plus the extra advantage of using my forum to ask more questions about the topics of the training, during the course and some time beyond the course. In those 24 hours, plus some more time of homework, you will be able to have a project of your own, presented in sheets, with the typical sets of views of a design development submission. The course is absolutely hands-on. I don't use Revit during the course, you do. You don't watch me using Revit, I guide you and watch you doing your own project. We don't study isolated tools, we do a building. I don't improvise, I follow a sequence that I have used for several years, and I write all the documentation of my classes and I post them in my forum. If you want to move to the next level, to learn other topics that are useful for doing projects in architectural offices, in a team, then you might take other topics on demand, or another package of two or three weeks. It all depends how far you want to go. Later on, whenever you are willing to learn the advanced topics, yes I teach that, too. You pay about the same that you would pay in an training center for each course. Paying for something that is structured, organized, professional, gives you a technical advantage, a solid starting point, in a relatively short time, about how to do projects with Revit.
          Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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            #6
            Alfredo: Your Training on Revit Families looks quite interesting. Definitely going to keep this in mind! Just bookmarked your site, will check back when I have time for training. Glad you posted.

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              #7
              Thanks everybody for such quick replies.

              Finearc, Thanks for leading to lynda.com. I checked it. looks very convincing. but first I want to try out something for free if i dont succeed then will give it a try.

              Elton Williams, thanks for the comforting words. Yes i am good at rest of the stuff you mentioned except revit. Its just this 1 yr break that i took bcoz I had kids is making me nervous till I land on to a job. Will work on your advice.

              Pixelforce, thanks for your reply. I had done some 3D during early 2000s. havent touched it for a decade now. your renderings are cool. They just look like pics. Hope I will be able to master revit like you someday.

              Alfredo, What are the fees for your courses.

              Comment


                #8
                I didn't see anyone encourage this in my skimming so, I'll do it. I recommend new users model something real the first time. I recommend their house more often than anything else. It's there, you can check it with the model and theoretically, you care about it and almost every one I know in architecture has drawings they've made of their house in CAD already. The sample projects are good for learning buttons and designing some flight of fancy is easy to cut corners on. Definitely download your 30day trial and start on your house. You're more likely to stick with it and make it work which will help you retain what you watch in any video or learn in any class. That being said... if you are self teaching (for the most part) think of your first Revit project this way... build it in Revit the way you would build it in the real world. Or at least learn the tools in that order. Actual design workflows are different but you'll pick that up. Second thing is to refine, refine, refine. It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. You can edit your sketches and change dimensions anytime. Use generic content first and then make it better.

                I've seen a lot of people go through various different training scenarios and the one thing that seems to hold true is that the people who go straight into making something real in Revit tend to assimilate the knowledge better than those who don't. I've modeled my house no less than six different times (from scratch) over the last 8 years as I learn to do more with Revit. It's definitely worth it... and you have to start somewhere.
                Kell D. Pollard, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP - Project Manager, BIM Specialist, Designer
                http://www.bimspecialistlex.com
                http://www.facebook.com/BimSpecialistLex
                http://www.linkedin.com/in/kellp

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                  #9
                  I wholeheartedly agree with DJKell. I recommend they start with the last project THEY did in their discipline, and they have the familiarity with it they need to focus on the revit training, but they have real and attainable goals (the roof slopes this way, not that way) that allows them to not "fudge it" as a learning exercise.
                  Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                  @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by DJKell View Post
                    I recommend new users model something real the first time. I recommend their house more often than anything else. It's there, you can check it with the model and theoretically, you care about it and almost every one I know in architecture has drawings they've made of their house in CAD already. The sample projects are good for learning buttons and designing some flight of fancy is easy to cut corners on. Definitely download your 30day trial and start on your house. ...

                    I've seen a lot of people go through various different training scenarios and the one thing that seems to hold true is that the people who go straight into making something real in Revit tend to assimilate the knowledge better than those who don't. ... It's definitely worth it... and you have to start somewhere.
                    Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
                    I wholeheartedly agree with DJKell. I recommend they start with the last project THEY did in their discipline, and they have the familiarity with it they need to focus on the revit training, but they have real and attainable goals (the roof slopes this way, not that way) that allows them to not "fudge it" as a learning exercise.
                    I second (third?) both of these. When I first started trying to learn Revit I would play with all the cool toys but never really learned much. When I had a project (and a deadline) I was forced to figure it out and actually learn it. After 18 months of almost non-stop Revit use at work I still learn something new just about every day, although not always about Revit. Often it is about how a building is actually built because once I try to model some exotic condition I have to stop and think instead of just drawing lines that kind of look like what I want or using a typical detail that isn't really correct. In all - I'm better at my job because of it

                    If you don't do your house - take a set of CD's from a recent job and build the project. You have a good reference point and quite possibly will find mistakes in the CAD drawings :crazy:

                    It could also be my own personal experience but I've learned more on my own or by asking questions here than I ever did sitting in a reseller training class. I've never done a class like Alfredo's so I can't comment on it but based on what I've seen him post here I would guess that it's a good value.
                    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                    chad
                    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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