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So I finally gave up, and became a CAD manager

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    So I finally gave up, and became a CAD manager

    Due to lack of faith (by some) in Revit and perceived speed of producing documentation in CAD, we are putting Revit back onto the shelf for the next project.

    The good old days of manual drafting beckon for our next project. I'm trying really hard not take it as a personal affront and also am looking to see if I could have done anything better, more efficiently, to have proved that BIM should be pursued.

    For the past 12 months I have tried constantly to address the "change in process" that is required. But the current market is proving that we must chase work at any cost, and we must deliver projects with less time and cost, not ideal for Revit, especially when we found it hard to recruit a only few decent extra staff for our last project.

    I gave up after too many arguments about whether CAD or BIM is better. :banghead:

    Does anyone know of some good metrics to gauge which software would have been better? Hard to judge unless I run parallel projects.
    Last edited by Dandharma; September 18, 2012, 11:36 AM.

    #2
    Looks like soon Aaron will connquer Dubai market as well.

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      #3
      Originally posted by cerb0z View Post
      Looks like soon Aaron will connquer Dubai market as well.
      Not doubting Aaron's ability, but I think it's safe to say Dubai has no shortage of very talented people already.

      Comment


        #4
        I know I'm supposed to be invigorated by seeing stuff like that, but why do i also feel sad?
        I know why, 'cos he did it, and I just can't. The imagination, lateral thinking and just plain brains is amazing.
        Motorbike riding is one long bezier curve

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          #5
          Originally posted by snowyweston View Post
          Not doubting Aaron's ability, but I think it's safe to say Dubai has no shortage of very talented people already.
          Andy is indeed talented, I hope I can convince him to present those mashrabiya at our next revit user group.

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            #6
            We continue to use Revit because it's faster than using AutoCAD
            Rick Moore, AIA
            Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

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              #7
              Originally posted by biff View Post
              I know I'm supposed to be invigorated by seeing stuff like that, but why do i also feel sad?
              I know why, 'cos he did it, and I just can't. The imagination, lateral thinking and just plain brains is amazing.
              and, he's a blues guitarist...a pretty good one at that. Some people get ALL of the talent
              I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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                #8
                Both-Feet-In

                You have one foot in and one out..........how can you objectively compare which direction is correct?

                Moving to Revit is a process that starts with a commitment to change the way we design and document buildings for the better. The decision is as important as the implementation.

                If you have an experienced team of Revit users working on your project you can compare it against a project utilizing Autocad run with experienced Autocad users. Compare the success against accuracy, speed, budget, responsiveness to client needs, and overall satisfaction of the team (whole team...consultants, etc) that the job has been turned-out successfully.

                I can tell you now that your answer will be Autocad if you judge the success of the project against you desire to use Autocad. The forums are rife with stories of firms failing to commit to Revit from the to down and losing big as a result (any software change would yield the same result at that point).

                I suggest a both-feet-in approach.
                Kevin Carroll
                BIM Manager

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                  #9
                  I don't have any metrics to for you to use as a gauge, as every project is different and or unique, with their own quirks/opportunities............that being said though, the ONE CONSTANT I always run accross all the time is that users, espceially, newbies, ALWAYS want to use Revit, any flavor of it, As Autocad....PERIOD.
                  Part of this stems from that mentality that "I can do this faster in CAD", which may or may not be correct THE FIRST TIME something is drawn..........but then I show them that when that first change to the project comes around, while their scrambling to find everything and everywhere that vhnge affects sometinh, I've already gone on to bigger and better things...like I don't know.....CONTINUING TO DESIGN on the project. The other part Stems from Managements' attitude..........PERIOD. Unless one the the management members are "Working" on the project, and the y have no Idea what is isnvloved with the process using Revit, they tend to adopt the same attitude as the 'users'.........when in reality, it is the opposite. If a Project's budget is busted, as a result of using Revit...it's usually becuase it wasn't used correctly from the get-go.

                  My 2 cents worth.

                  I'd just as soon quit (And I have in the past!!!) a job that wanted to go backwards and Not use Revit, than use CAD.

                  Mike
                  Michael L. Maloney
                  BIM Design Automation Coord.
                  CH2M Hill/SPB
                  :banghead:

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                    #10
                    In previous careers I have witnessed similar reticence on behalf of management to change like this.
                    There is a scare factor wound up in lack of knowledgeable staff, finances and going out on a limb.
                    Nothing will convince some of these people apart from one of their own, or clients pointing it out.
                    Some quiet paralleling of small projects can help, where the outlay hasn't been much nor has the time spent.
                    I can see how it could be very difficult for some to make this type of change.
                    Motorbike riding is one long bezier curve

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