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    Varying Slope Hipped Roof

    Hi, I'm new to this forum . . .couldn't find an answer to this anywhere on here so I'm hoping someone can help. I do residential design and I currently have two homes I'm working on that I'm fighting the same problem on with the roof. I've tried several different ways to get these to work and sometimes I can get it to work and sometimes I can't, but I just feel like there's got to be something I'm missing and don't know! I'm mostly self taught in Revit, so I'm wondering if I'm making this harder than it has to be?

    With the first house, it has a little slope change at the bottom. I would just do this as roof by extrusion, but it's hipped. I'll look for a picture of what I'm trying to do . . .


    Ok, I'd never heard of this before, but it would be like the Bonnet Roof pictured here.

    I need to be able to do this with one pitch on the front and back and another on the sides. Anyone have any ideas? Or need more information? The house I'm referring to is obviously more complicated than this, but the main section of the house is pretty straight-forward.

    #2
    First, welcome to RFo!

    Second, there's no picture attached to your thread.

    Third, if I'm picturing the roof correctly in my head, you will probably need to do this with 2 separate roofs. Check out THIS pdf. It's a good resource for creating a roof in Revit. Check out the bonnet roof on page 11, that's what I'm talking about when I say use 2 roofs.

    As for the different pitches for the front and back, just sketch the roof. Then pick the sketch lines and check "defines slope" in the options bar. Then, in the properties, input what pitch you want each side to have.
    dzatto
    Moderator
    "OMG I killed Revit"
    Last edited by dzatto; September 11, 2012, 11:11 PM.
    Dan

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      #3
      Sorry about the picture . . .it shows up in my thread . . .will have to figure out how to get it to show up for you! I will check out the PDF. I do know how to do different pitches, I'm not a Revit newby . . .I have done this with two different roofs (which works on one project and not well on another). I just can't get them to join each other properly. Will look at the PDF then try to work on the picture! Thanks!

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        #4
        I would use two roofs and join them....both specifying slopes....

        FYI....Inline photo attachments are not recommended....please use a regular attachment. Hence some people can't see them...I see it fine.
        MPwuzhere
        R.I.P.
        Last edited by MPwuzhere; September 11, 2012, 11:51 PM.
        Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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          #5
          Hoping this shows up now?

          Comment


            #6
            Roof Problem 3D 1.jpgRoof Problem 3D 2.jpg
            Ok, this is one of the two projects . . .this is two roofs built basically on top of each other. In the first pic you can see I can't get the hips to line up. In the second pic it actually looks pretty close to what it should. Part of my problem is I'm not a framing or truss expert and I haven't been able to figure out exactly how this would actually be built. My client REALLY wants this little "notch" in the roof at the bottom and it will look really good, but I've got to be able to make it! lol Oh, and this pitch change will be repeated on all the other roofs on this home. So I really need to get it to work. : ) I'm off probably for the day . . .appreciate all the help. I'm so glad I found this forum, I think it's going to be very helpful to me!

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              #7
              Perhaps something like the attached model? As for how to build it....The primary roof is just like any other and is attached to the headers on the walls with no overhang. Add a 2x10 at the end of the roof joists and continue the lower roof. Although this type of roof is usually used to cover porches, it may need to overlap the trusses some for more load support since it would usually have corner posts.
              Attached Files
              Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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                #8
                I understand what you're saying, and yes I understand it's normally for porches, but a lot of the porches now have it going up beyond the wall. Same with this house. If I let the main section of roof go to the top of the wall then do the small lower pitch section as the overhang it's not enough. Make sense? This house won't have a lot of overhang anyway. I need it to go further toward the interior. Also, I will have varying pitches. Specifically I need to do a 12/12 on the sides (for the steeper part) and an 8/12 on the front and back. The main section of house (the 2 story part) is 36' wide and 40' deep. I need these pitches to have the right look AND to get that little flat part on top. I'm going to keep playing with it. Thanks for the model. I've looked at it really closely and I'm going to see if I can tweak it to see if I can do it the same way on mine.

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                  #9
                  Bonnet Roof Adjusted.jpg
                  So I played with this file . . .I adjusted the walls to 36' wide x 40' deep. Also the big roof to 12/12 sides and 8/12 front and back. That made the angles of the hips not line up. I adjusted the smaller chunk of roof to 6/12 on the sides and 4/12 front and back. The hips almost line up, but my eaves aren't aligned b/c of the different pitches. Any advice on which way would be best to align the eaves? I'm still playing with this. I'm thinking of calling a truss manufacturer to see how they would do this to give me a better grasp on what I can and can't do. : (
                  Attached Files

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                    #10
                    The issue is that, on the bottom roof, you have the same overhang for the 6:12 pitch as you do for the 4:12 pitch. That's why the ridge lines aren't lining up.

                    So, if you have a 2.5' overhang with a 4:12 pitch, your rise is 10". The same overhang for a 6:12 pitch is 15". Something has to give. I simply made the 6:12 side overhang 1'-8", and it all lines up now.
                    Attached Files
                    Dan

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