Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Specialty Equipment

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Specialty Equipment

    Category used for:
    abcdefghijklm

    OOTB Templates:
    abcdefghijklm.rft

    RFO Templates:
    RFO_ abcdefghijklm.rft

    Graphics:
    Cutable = Yes or No
    Depth Clip = Yes or No
    Join Geometry (in Project) = Yes or No

    Known Category Restrictions:
    abcdefghijklm

    Parameters (System / Seek / RFO)

    Construction

    Material and Finishes

    Dimensions

    Identity Data
    Keynote
    Model
    Manufacturer
    Type Comments
    URL
    Description
    Assembly Code
    Cost
    OmniClass Number

    Green Building Properties

    Construction

    Graphics:

    Subcategories (System / Seek / RFO)

    Category Specific "Best Practices"

    Level of Detail (LOD)



    Document History:
    • ........
    Last edited by Munkholm; February 28, 2011, 11:06 AM.
    Klaus Munkholm
    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

    #2
    When is something Specialty Equipment and when is it a Generic Model? I worked with one contractor who said we should make everything SE since a GM was too vague but that doesn't sound like a very good distinction. I use them pretty much interchangeably but wanted to see what others are doing and if there's some additional rigor we want to bring to this discussion.
    Greg McDowell Jr
    about.me/GMcDowellJr

    Comment


      #3
      SE can't be shown as cut, but a GM can... How's that for a difference?

      Besides... There's no black or white answer to this... Looking in the OOTB family folders will give you an idea of how it was intended to be divided, but only with lots of experience and knowing your special needs, will it be possible to answer in a serious manner.
      Klaus Munkholm
      "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

      Comment


        #4
        For example, I design lube centers, car washes, and dry cleaners. I use specialty equipment for all of my custom equipment families. I don't want them to be cut in section. I don't care what the inside of a dry clean machine looks like, just the building. :laugh:
        Dan

        Comment


          #5
          Elaborating on the other response, Specialty Equipment is meant to be used to describe things that don't fall into other "obvious" categories, that don't normally get "cut" in sections or detail sections and are usually part of the Specialties and Equipment CSI (Construction Specification Institute) designations (like theater equipment uses Division 11 and sections 11060, 61 & 62). It's a "catch-all" category. When it is normal to create a section detail that should use a heavier "cut" line style then Generic Model is "your man", another catch-all...

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
            ...we should make everything SE since a GM was too vague...
            I tend to agree that simply using Generic Model is too vague, so when I do use a GM, I ALWAYS use some sort of sub category, so it isn't so vague, and so that sub category can get different graphic and visibility treatment as needed. However, I think it is a good practice to avoid adding categories willy nilly, so I always look for some non GM category that makes sense first, and use GM as a last resort/kludge. I prefer a Downspout sub cat of GM rather than using Plumbing, because I want the downspouts to show fat cut lines in plan, but thin projection lines in elevation. I also use a GM Hardware category for all sorts of hardware bits, for doors, windows and casework. And lastly I have used GM for Gym Striping for basketball and volleyball courts and the like. But the backboard is Specialty Equipment. Not much GM stuff if I can help it, most stuff is Specialty Equipment. All the stuff hung off the walls in partitions in a restroom is specialty equipment. Marker boards and blackboards and such, specialty equipment. GM gets abused for these things way too often.

            Gordon
            Pragmatic Praxis

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
              SE can't be shown as cut, but a GM can... How's that for a difference?
              That's an important distinction... one I wasn't aware of. Here's another, you can Join GM but can't Join SE.

              It may be counter-intuitive but I put counterops in the GM category so I can make L and U shaped counters without making separate families. Also sinks can have voids that cut the GM when placed in the project environment.
              Greg McDowell Jr
              about.me/GMcDowellJr

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
                That's an important distinction... one I wasn't aware of. Here's another, you can Join GM but can't Join SE.

                It may be counter-intuitive but I put counterops in the GM category so I can make L and U shaped counters without making separate families. Also sinks can have voids that cut the GM when placed in the project environment.
                ahhh, nice tip. I'm not sure if that is counter-intuitive, as you said. But that seems like a simple way to make different shaped counter tops. Just model each leg and join them.

                Anyone have a reason why this isn't a good solution? If not, I'm stealing this one from you. :thumbsup:
                Dan

                Comment


                  #9
                  Here, let me help you.

                  I also made it line based so it's easy to extend, trim, fillet, etc.
                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by GMcDowellJr; December 14, 2011, 09:15 PM.
                  Greg McDowell Jr
                  about.me/GMcDowellJr

                  Comment


                    #10
                    GM countertops join?! Now that is a nifty trick. Only thing I would change is to use a Countertop subcategory of GM. Not vague, joins, cut by sinks. Three birds, one stone, woot!

                    Gordon
                    Pragmatic Praxis

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X