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How do you render glass in blue color ?

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    How do you render glass in blue color ?

    Hi everyone, i am just wondering how i can render glass in blue color instead of default clear glass that give black color.
    i even change type of glass from clear to blue but it gives me also black as in the example
    so i am looking into suggestion that may solve this problem
    Attached Files

    #2
    Lighting...

    I can see your glass is blue in the relections, but its not generating enough of them to show the glass colour. Go outside and look at any window of a room with the lights off. Ifs it sunny outside, the glass appears black.
    Darryl Store - Associate (BIM)
    [email protected]
    Twitter: @darrylstore

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      #3
      Originally posted by Darryl PRP View Post
      ...Go outside and look at any window of a room with the lights off. Ifs it sunny outside, the glass appears black.
      Almost correct... It depends on the viewing angle... If you look at a window placed above you, you should see blue reflections of the sky (assuming the sky is blue, and not grey as here in the Kingdom)

      So instead of playing with the colors, you should play some with the Reflectance on the glass material, and the sunlight settings in the scene... But even then, the windows at ground level will (correctly) appear as black (unless you light up the interior).

      Edit: Keep in mind, that (mostly) glass is NOT blue... It's normally clear, and only appears as blue due to reflections. Same thing with the ocean... last time I checked, water ain't blue either... it just appears that way in some conditions.

      :beer:
      Last edited by Munkholm; January 17, 2012, 02:00 PM.
      Klaus Munkholm
      "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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        #4
        So you are suggesting to light all the windows inside which will make the file rendering take a plenty of time.(if it was possible)
        what if glass has in realistic blue color and not transparent color i see in real that some glass has pure blue or pure green which what i want to achive here also.
        Last edited by ahmed_hassan; January 17, 2012, 02:02 PM.

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          #5
          I would go with Munkholms suggestion and bump up the reflectance of the glass. If you're worried about time, have you tried Autodesk's cloud rendering solution? assuming you're on subscription).
          Darryl Store - Associate (BIM)
          [email protected]
          Twitter: @darrylstore

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by ahmed_hassan View Post
            So you are suggesting to light all the windows inside which will make the file rendering take a plenty of time.(if it was possible)
            what if glass has in realistic blue color and not transparent color i see in real that some glass has pure blue or pure green which what i want to achive here also.
            No, don't turn on the interior lights in this case - just mentioned that as another possibility to avoid black windows, though it won't make them blue either.

            If the glass is in fact blue, you should play with BOTH the color and the reflectance of the material, and not least look at your sun/daylight/sky settings.
            And maybe even try changing the number of sheets of glass... Believe this is like changing the IOR in "real" rendering software...
            Klaus Munkholm
            "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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              #7
              Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
              Edit: Keep in mind, that (mostly) glass is NOT blue... It's normally clear, and only appears as blue due to reflections. Same thing with the ocean... last time I checked, water ain't blue either... it just appears that way in some conditions.
              gosh, how boring it must be in the Kingdom! In the US I would bet that 99+% of exterior glazing is not clear. Blue glass has been around for years and has been used in many large high profile high rise projects. But for most of those years blue glass had a slight green tint. In '09 PPG patented a method of making truly blue glass. I've used it in a couple of projects and it's beautiful
              I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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                #8
                Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
                gosh, how boring it must be in the Kingdom! In the US I would bet that 99+% of exterior glazing is not clear...
                Gosh, how depressing it must be to be inside a building in the US. :laugh:

                Seriously though... I know that in certain parts of the world, blue-ish glass is considered as being fancy. Personally I've only been involved with ONE office project where it was used - The client pretty much demanded it, because the blue colors fitted with the coorporate colors - Turned out to be THE project with the most negative feedback from the users of the building, most of them felt depressive after just a few hours of work.... Maybe just a bad combination of dimmed glazing, in a part of the world where the sky is dimmed most of the time too?

                Anyhow - Glass should be clear, and where apliacle, the sun kept out by building design, and not by blue-ish glass... Just my 2 c

                Ahmed - If you like, you can send your project file to Munkholm at revitforum dot org, and I'll take a stab at it later tonight.
                Klaus Munkholm
                "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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                  #9
                  I've always just used blue spray paint to tint it blue.
                  -Alex Cunningham

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Alex Cunningham View Post
                    I've always just used blue spray paint to tint it blue.
                    Guess the UI is different in RST? Can't seem to find a "Spray Paint" button in RAC... LOL
                    Klaus Munkholm
                    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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