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Rendering in Revit VS. Other Platforms: is it worth learning something new?

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    Rendering in Revit VS. Other Platforms: is it worth learning something new?

    OK, so I get asked this question a lot it seems. It goes something like this:

    "I'm a Revit user getting more and more into rendering. I've seen the fancy results of <insert other 3D tool here>. Should I spend the time and effort learning the new tool and do my renderings with it instead?"

    My two cents is: No. Don't take the time/money/effort unless you've really hit the limits of Revit's rendering abilities or you really really REALLY want to learn something new.

    I'm personally finding that more and more the overhead required to get a model out of Revit and into another system just isn't worth the increase in quality a lot of the time. These days I'm only using other packages when I can't do what I need to do with Revit. Otherwise I just render in Revit.

    What can't I do in Revit? Photorealisitc interiors with lots of light sources in a short timeframe and animations.

    Anyways, most of the time I'm asked this question it's being asked by someone who's still learning how to render well in Revit. A new toolset, while maybe giving better results sometimes, it's not going to help you learn basics faster or better. And you already know Revit, right? So why not stick with it a little bit longer, don't get (too) envious of those screenshots on the Maxwell / Octane / Vray / Whatever website, and instead get as good as you can with just Revit.

    And then when you really feel like Revit's limiting you, THEN deal with the pain of learning a new system. Because there is pain there, oh yes. And the time involved in just exporting models and re-doing things in the other system make it such that you really need to have a good reason to jump through those hoops. Otherwise you're just wasting time and money!

    But this is just my 2 cents here. What do y'all think? Should people jump right into the deep end instead? Now with the 'bundle' and lots more people having access to MAX, does this idea change? I say no because MAX sucks, but that's just me.
    Jeffrey McGrew
    Architect & Founder
    Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
    Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

    #2
    Very well said Jeffery! POTM nomination for you
    Klaus Munkholm
    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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      #3
      Although I never use Revit for rendering, I agree 100%
      I can't use Revit for rendering because I don't want to feel stupid for buying MAX!
      Seriously... the truth is that I make renderings for other engineers too so I had to learn something better, with more capabilities...
      I use MAX and Maxwell... and I have an Octane license but I haven't got a really fast GPU card...
      What you say is true for most users but I must say that I hate seing Adesk to let Revit rendering so much behind the competition...
      Many years before I was working with ACAD and McNeel Accurender 3.1 for ACAD... then I changed to Revit and I was happy to see that Accurender was embeded and then I was ungry to see that it was not the complete package...
      Then I was happy again to see that mental ray was added to Revit, and then I got ungry again because the Revit edition of mental ray wasn't even half the full app... and untill now it is the same.... And finally I was happy because I could say to myself that spending those money for Max and Maxwell was probably a good idea....
      Combined with the millions of free 3d models I can use... YES! I think I have to go on with something new and more powerful than Revit rendering.
      Revit Architecture - 3ds MAX Design - Octane Render - and many working hours...

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        #4
        Max 2012 is a far cry from "suck," but like every other advanced program out there it takes time and effort to learn. If you have the knowledge, you can get amazing results, and the time spent is no more than you would have spent in Revit.

        The idea that there's some sort of competition worth betting on or weighing in to is a bit absurd, and, like most of these arguments (Apple vs. Microsoft, Android vs. iPhone, Beer vs. wine, etc. ad nauseum) it's disingenuous.

        Learn what you can, use what you know, do good work.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Darken Rahl View Post
          Max 2012 is a far cry from "suck," but like every other advanced program out there it takes time and effort to learn. If you have the knowledge, you can get amazing results, and the time spent is no more than you would have spent in Revit.
          I've put in the time. It still sucks. Sorry, I know I'm a minority there. I just don't like the UI, how complex everything is, and how unstable it can be. Oh and the autosave is terrible. When I've got other options I like more, I use them. It's very much a matter of personal taste. On a technical level there isn't anything wrong with Max at all. It's top notch there. It's just that I'd rather use other tools that I don't feel waste my time...

          No one was saying that there was a competition between the programs. But there is one in workflow. And what I was trying to do is tell people to not waste their time trying to learn Max until they actually need to (or really want to). I get a lot of folks asking me about it, so I thought I'd post about it here to help them all out.
          Jeffrey McGrew
          Architect & Founder
          Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
          Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

          Comment


            #6
            This is one of the pie in the sky questions, that I feel usually best answered on an individual basis. Some companies don't want or even need the high quality renderings. Where as other companies it is a must. Time and money are and your companies requirements are what is important not whether you need the best rendering in the world.

            I find that people tend to over model inside of Revit. Sure you can have that 3D truss system that looks amazing but how much time did it take you to make and when you produce working drawings or even 3D Renderings, how often do you see these truss's. This is just an example of where people waste time and effort.

            + Rep to Jeffrey for making a 100% accurate assessment of what is happening in the market at the moment.

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