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Jason Grant: 7 Reasons Why Competition is Good

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    Jason Grant: 7 Reasons Why Competition is Good

    I got this general outline and bulletpoints from a post on ProBlogger Blog Tips which had a great guest post by Sean Houser of StartByDoing.com
    It was a really interesting post and I thought it could be applicable to AEC software with some rewrites.
    1. Lots of competition means there’s lots to write about
    With competition, there is more to write about for all of the bloggers out there. Sure, there is never an end to the how-to posts but the real excitement comes when you can compare products, get the scoop on something new or theorize what the future may be.
    2. More competition means more idea sourcesThe more I get into software, the more I see how so many tools and logic have been merged from other sources. With competition there is a greater ability to increase the idea sources for further development and new ideas.
    The future belongs to a very different kind of person with a very different kind of mind—creators and empathizers, pattern recognizers, and meaning makers. These people—artists, inventors, designers, storytellers, caregivers, consolers, big picture thinkers—will now reap society’s richest rewards and share its greatest joys.
    Daniel H Pink - A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future
    3. More competition means more channels for your content
    With more people passionate about different software there are more possibilities for your blog, twitter, facebook, linkedin being shared with a greater audience.
    4. More business models to follow
    Each company is different with their business models. Where one may be innovative through acquisition another may be through internal development. Where one is guarding it’s development another may be more open to their customer requests and needs. Each business model will change the process of development of new tools and processes.
    Plans let the past drive the future. They put blinders on you. “This is where we’re going because, well, that’s where we said we were going.” And that’s the problem: Plans are inconsistent with improvisation.
    Jason Fried - Rework
    5. More opportunities to partner and mastermind with top players
    If one is open to discussing the pros and cons of a software with someone who uses another software, that would allow them to learn from each other. If the top players (masterminds) of different software packages compared notes could their combined efforts help create a super product?
    “Good to Great companies think differently about the role of technology. They never use technology as a primary means of igniting a transformation. Yet, paradoxically, they are pioneers in the application of selected technologies."
    Good to Great by Jim Collins
    6. More competition means more opinions and points of view
    How many times have you thought that this tool or process cannot be the only or best way to accomplish the task at hand? Common knowledge is not an excuse for accepting that your current practice is the best way to work. Challenging what works and what does not is the only way that one can force innovation if adequate changes are not being made in the industry. Do you want to be heard more? Do you want to see changes instead of talk?
    The more expensive it is to make a change, the less likely you are to make it. Huge organizations can take years to pivot. They talk instead of act. They meet instead of do. But if you keep your mass low, you can quickly change anything: your entire business model, product, feature set, and/or marketing message.
    Jason Fried - Rework
    7. Competition forces you to be the best you can be
    Without competition, how would there be innovation to challenge the status quo? What would be the reason to take a chance without competition? If you are the only one who does this particular thing, where is the challenge to be the best you can be?
    99% of the time, in my experience, the hard part about creativity isn't coming up with something no one has ever thought of before. The hard part is actually executing the thing you've thought of.
    Seth Godin


    Click here to view the entire blog post.

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