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    How our two systems compare

    I'm the IT guy, not the revit user.

    We have 2 systems. Both running Revit Architecture Suite 2012.

    System 1:
    i7 920 6GB Ram 10K rpm drive Win7 64bit. System is 1.5 years old.
    This is NOT a dedicated render pc. The architect uses it for daily work too. He's rendering some building with 776 artifial lights. High, 600dpi, Exterior Sun and Artificial light, Sky: Few Clouds.

    All 8 cores (4 cores + HT) are pegged at 100% It's been rendering for over 5 days and it's at 64% complete. (the CPU is pegged when all other apps are closed)

    System 2:
    Freshly built AMD 6174 12 Cores. 16GB Ram 10K rpm drive Win7 64bit.
    This is dedicated for rendering. Rendering the exact file as above (776 artificial lights). CPU are only at 9%. The rendering is 50% complete after 15hrs.

    System 2 is rendering faster which was expected but why aren't the 12 cores at 100% or closer too it?

    EDIT---The CPU's finally hit 100% utilization when the rendering hit 53% complete.

    Any insight would be helpful.

    Thank you,

    Scott
    mrbostn
    Junior Member
    Last edited by mrbostn; October 13, 2011, 01:14 PM. Reason: more info

    #2
    I'm not an IT guy, just Revit user... So don't hold me accountable for any nonsense that comes out of me...

    First off: I hope the 776 lights are on purpose to max out the machine. Other wise, your architect is insane for even wanting to render this with Revit...

    Second: what kind of motherboard and internal memory are you using in the second pc? To me, this looks like a clear case of "traffic jam", iow: your data can't get to the CPU's fast enough to fully utilise them... The reason it hits 100% after 53% (probably has been skyrocketing from around 50%) is that from this point on your render is going to do the "second run". Smoothing out the pixels from the first run.
    I believe that at this point your whole render is in cache so there's no more traffic jam.

    Again: that's my gut feeling, not supported by any advanced knowledge. If you are driving a V12 engine, you'd better make sure your fuel lines are big enough to pump in the gas. A lot of times (not saying this is the case here) these kind of specs get placed on some twobit cheapa$$ Korean crappy motherboard which will render (:laugh them useless...
    Martijn de Riet
    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
    MdR Advies
    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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      #3
      The MoBO is a Supermicro MBD-H8SGL-F-O. Newegg.com - SUPERMICRO MBD-H8SGL-F-O ATX Server Motherboard Socket G34 AMD SR5650 DDR3 1333
      Here's the HD Newegg.com - Western Digital VelociRaptor WD1500HLFS 150GB 10000 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

      The 776 lights were NOT done for testing. The architect has been trying to render this for a month. Last week I finally got the okay to buy/build the 12 core AMD.
      As of now the score is
      Intel i7 69% 5 days 17hrs
      AMD 12 Core 59% 16hrs 33minutes.

      Comment


        #4
        Well, you lost me at the specs, although the DDR3 1333 internal RAM doesn't sound all that state of the art... I'll leave the rest up to the people who actually know what they are talking about...

        But I will say this though (you might want to get the architect in to read this):

        YOU ARE NEVER EVER GETTING ANY DECENT RENDER TIME WITH 776 FREAKING LIGHTS!!!

        Why oh why didn't you upgrade to the Premium Building Suite and use 3D Max for this kind of renders? Is your video card CUDA enabled? Try Octane Render. You could have saved the hassle of buying a very expensive machine and still have a week render time... But for the love of god: do not ever think you can create these kind of renders faster then when you were colouring them in yourself.

        Revit is not intended, nor suited for these kind of scenes... sorry to be the bearer of bad news...
        Martijn de Riet
        Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
        MdR Advies
        Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

        Comment


          #5
          No worries-I got my "high" from getting to buy/build the AMD. No video card in the AMD. just onboard video. Low end stuff. Server mobo's have crappy video.

          As far as the memory goes there not many other choices for an AMD G34 CPU. I was going for cores. I don't think it's a memory bootleneck. Nevertheless, It's chugging away. The AMD will soon pass the i7 920. I like your idea about using 3D Max. Not that I know anything about it. I really want to build a render farm/wall. and use distributed rendering. Although GPU rendering may make render farms obsolete.

          I'll tell him to read this thread.

          Thank you for your input. I appreciate it.

          Comment


            #6
            The Cloud renderer can handle it. The image in post #2 here http://www.revitforum.org/rendering-...199-cloud.html had almost a thousand lights and it rendered in less than 20 minutes
            Rick Moore, AIA
            Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

            Comment


              #7
              Well, you can't use Revit for a render farm. Isn't supported and frankly, I don't see it happening any time soon (since they have 3D Max for that kind of high-end renders. 3D Max does support it however).

              btw: I wouldn't be surprised if the i7 is going into a meltdown any time soon. It has too little ram to complete a render like this. If you can't save the image when you're done, it's a memory issue (just giving you a headsup).

              Stick around, we have some real cracks on the hardware around here... They might have some really useful insights here.
              Martijn de Riet
              Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
              MdR Advies
              Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Rick Moore View Post
                The Cloud renderer can handle it. The image in post #2 here http://www.revitforum.org/rendering-...199-cloud.html had almost a thousand lights and it rendered in less than 20 minutes
                Yup, but that has other real limitations.. no decals, no rpc, no self-illuminating materials. Too many limitations if you ask me.
                Martijn de Riet
                Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                MdR Advies
                Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
                  Yup, but that has other real limitations.. no decals, no rpc, no self-illuminating materials. Too many limitations if you ask me.
                  Yes, but you can more than make up for this in Photoshop in the time it takes to render in Revit, and you'll get better results (yes, I went there )
                  Rick Moore, AIA
                  Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
                    Well, you can't use Revit for a render farm. Isn't supported and frankly, I don't see it happening any time soon (since they have 3D Max for that kind of high-end renders. 3D Max does support it however).

                    btw: I wouldn't be surprised if the i7 is going into a meltdown any time soon. It has too little ram to complete a render like this. If you can't save the image when you're done, it's a memory issue (just giving you a headsup).

                    Stick around, we have some real cracks on the hardware around here... They might have some really useful insights here.

                    I was aware of Revit not supporting distributed rendering. I'm a hardware guy and have been reading lots of threads here. Lots of tips. Though it seems everyone needs a "dual" purpose comptuer. One that can render and be useful with design/general office stuff.

                    The i7's been [email protected]% 24hrs x 5 days now Good thing it's got lots of cooling! I'll keep an eye on it. Thank for the tip.

                    I was building a rendering only pc. As the 12 cores are only 2.2Ghz. That wouldn't do well with designing/MS Office, etc.

                    I was thinking the Cloud. I don't know much about Autodesk's offering. I'll read up on it. I'm also not sure if the limitations of the cloud would apply to our architects project he's rendering now.

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