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    high-end laptop

    Hi guys,
    I'm seriously considering buying a new laptop, since my current HP is starting to literally fall apart... And it's limitations are becoming ever more clear, mostly cause it's still a 32 bit. I've been looking at this one. I can, for a large part, customize the thing and would value the input of some more experienced folks in this.

    Videocard:
    No more ATI for me, so the choice is between the Geforce GTX560M and the optional upgrade to the Quadro 5010M, which is a rediculous 1500,- more expensive. Is this even close to a decent ROI?

    CPU:
    4 options here, i7-950 and i7-960 (both quad core) and i7-980 and i7-990x (both SIX core). What is good value for my money?

    Overall:
    what do you guys think of the specs and the overall pricing. Money is not a problem for me, I believe that a slightly bigger investment in some decent hardware pays for itself.
    Off course my fundings are limited, but I'd gladly spent another 1500,- on top of the basic pricing if my laptop gets noticeably faster.

    btw: it's going to be used for small projects, large projects, rendering, Navisworks, 3D Max, and so on. So go nuts on this one guys... :laugh:
    mdradvies
    Moderator
    "Mark Twain"
    Last edited by mdradvies; September 29, 2011, 10:04 AM.
    Martijn de Riet
    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
    MdR Advies
    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

    #2
    If money is not an issue, why don't you consider a Thinkpad W520.
    Hardware is not smoking hot as in a sample above, but reliability, portability and service should be on it's side.
    Only thing is, it's display is 15" only - not an issue if you're hooked to external display 90% of the time, as in my case.
    Had three Thinkpads so far, without ANY problems.

    Comment


      #3
      Sorry, I prefer a local dealer. This shop is 15miles from me, they have their own support, they do pick-up and return with a company-provided loaner (minimum specs guaranteed) and everything. After being screwed over by HP (currently going into 10th week of laptop being in repair) that's even more important to me then the actual specs. So it's going to be this company, mainly cause it's 20min away from yelling at somebody other then a computer generated voice...
      Martijn de Riet
      Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
      MdR Advies
      Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

      Comment


        #4
        Hi Martijn,

        I totally understand where you're coming from with the "support", but you should at least be aware that those type of "build whatever you want" laptops don't really go through the same kind of system design as those cooked up in a Dell lab, etc. Now, I'm the first to say most of the "big brands" are junk, but in my experience, they tend to be a little more "designed" than what you're looking at. What I mean by that is they've really been tested with all the hardware options for long-term stability, cooling, etc.

        That being said, you've pretty much cooked up a portable desktop. The i7-9xx series is not intended for laptop use. It doesn't have the same kind of power management capabilities as mobile CPUs, etc. If you intend to always be plugged into a wall socket, or only need brief times on battery power, and don't mind it being rather loud from fan noise as it tries to keep that desktop CPU cool in a laptop enclosure (I'm assuming - I obviously haven't heard it first-hand), rather heavy(!), and don't mind having a last-gen CPU (non-Sandy Bridge), then this is the laptop for you. I say go all out with the i7-990X! (or at least the i7-980X ).

        Most of the other laptops they sell use the Sandy Bridge mobile CPUs. Intel just introduced a few new ones (earlier this month) that these guys haven't gotten a hold of yet - i7-2960XM and i7-2860QM - I'm guessing they're going to show up any day now in their lineup (I'd call them about it). If you simply can't wait, I'd go with the i7-2920XM or i7-2820QM (depending on what your budget will allow). They might not quite get to the speed of the 990X/980X, but would be pretty close, and it would probably be a much better "laptop" experience... if that matters to you.

        I wouldn't bother with the i7-950/960.

        I would get an 120GB (or larger) SSD drive

        I wouldn't waste your money on the Quadro... the GF560M should be plenty for your needs (it should work great with Revit, but you never know).

        Hope that helps and better luck with your next laptop than your last!

        :beer:
        iru69
        Forum Co-Founder
        Last edited by iru69; September 29, 2011, 10:27 PM.

        Comment


          #5
          Hi Iru,

          Thanks for the reply.
          Point taken about the "testing". But then again, IF I can get decent support, it won't matter too much when it breaks down. Did I mention that I just reshipped my laptop (in the 10th week) cause it still doesn't charge the battery? So I'm probably looking at a grand total of 16-18 weeks without it. The new one can sure break down A LOT to top that...

          But I will wait for the new CPU's. Don't mind the noise (keeps me awake :laugh and I generally use it as a mobile desktop. But on occasions where I don't have a power outlet nearby it would be nice to have it run more then 45 minutes or so.

          I was planning on getting a 120GB SSD for the software and two mirrored (for backup) 750GB data drives.
          Martijn de Riet
          Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
          MdR Advies
          Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

          Comment

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