Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Revit laptop for student

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Revit laptop for student

    Hi there, I'm an architecture student and I need a new laptop (currently 3rd year) that will last me till the end of graduation -3.5 -4 more years. My work will be with Revit, 3ds max, Photoshop, Corel and a decent amount of final hi quality project renderings etc. My budget is around $1600 so I've narrowed my choices to these models:

    HP EliteBook 8560w(XU083UT) - i7 2630, 8GB, AMD 5950M, FullHD, no dreamcolor , 3 years warranty + Win 7 Pro
    or
    XPS 15 - i7 2630, 8GB, nVidia 540M, FullHD FullGamut screen, 4 years warranty + win 7 Home Premium


    So the main questions I have are:
    1. Is it worth it buying the expensive 8560w when the XPS has the same performance levels (not sure about the cooling in max CPU usage though)?
    2. Should I search for bigger 17" models or these 15" with external 24"monitor at home will be just about perfect? The weight is not such a big problem but the form factor is what bothers me. Anyway the most use case would be on a desk.
    3. There are cheaper options for the Intel 2520 and 2620 processors for the EliteBook. If I take one of those would it be sufficient for rendering large models like hotels, big public buildings and so on after 2-3 years because right now our projects are no bigger than a midsized bus terminals?
    4. Is the display scaling on 15.6" fullHD screen going to stretch all the icons of the programs (revit, cad) in an ugly manner? I hate displays that are not sharp.
    5. Any other proposals different form Mac and Sony?

    #2
    I am looking at 8560w also, and between slow speed quad core (2630) and faster dual cores (2540, 2620) I would go for a faster dual core, since Revit mostly uses one or two cores, except for rendering.
    5950m should be as fast as Quadro 2000m (haven't found any usable benchmark yet, except on http://www.notebookcheck.net. Only thing that bothers me is that with AMD graphics I won't have any CUDA rendering capability in the future (still not sure is that worthy).
    Also, I think that Home version of OS lacks some network capabilities (Offline folders) that were crucial for me in XP times to stick with Pro version.

    Comment


      #3
      I have never been a fan of running Revit on a laptop. You could spend just as much on a really good Revit desktop, buy a cheap laptop with a decent display then just remote it...you have the power of a desktop with the portability of a laptop...

      Comment


        #4
        @Hirvio: I don't know what these offline folders are and what are they used for. I think I can go without them am I right? As far as CUDA I think it is not that important as everybody claims.

        @gdoherty0102: I thought of the same alternative but I just can't find a decent laptop with good screen. The only available with higher res are 17" but they are too big to carry around. Could you propose something for about $800-900 so that there is something left for a i5 desktop? Or should I buy a $1000 laptop and $600 screen and save some more for powerful i7+ssd desktop in the future?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by dilomo View Post
          @Hirvio: I don't know what these offline folders are and what are they used for. I think I can go without them am I right? As far as CUDA I think it is not that important as everybody claims.

          @gdoherty0102: I thought of the same alternative but I just can't find a decent laptop with good screen. The only available with higher res are 17" but they are too big to carry around. Could you propose something for about $800-900 so that there is something left for a i5 desktop? Or should I buy a $1000 laptop and $600 screen and save some more for powerful i7+ssd desktop in the future?
          Going this option using a laptop as a screen for a desktop the laptop really never should need to be replaced (other than hardware malfunctioning). So to start off I would get a pretty good laptop that will run revit up front. I feel that computers have about a 2-3 (perhaps 4) year life. When your laptop starts to drag in a couple of years, do a fresh install with minimal installed on it, then put your money to a great desktop to link up with.

          Comment


            #6
            Going this option using a laptop as a screen for a desktop the laptop really never should need to be replaced (other than hardware malfunctioning). So to start off I would get a pretty good laptop that will run revit up front. I feel that computers have about a 2-3 (perhaps 4) year life. When your laptop starts to drag in a couple of years, do a fresh install with minimal installed on it, then put your money to a great desktop to link up with.
            What is a representative of "pretty good laptop" for you? For me is one like the XPS and HP but its price is good too. If you are talking for good specs in cheap alternative - that's another thing. So a cheap laptop with i7 2630 or i5 2410, at least nVidia 525M, 8GB RAM and 1366x768 screen is supposed to be enough right?
            Last edited by dilomo; September 19, 2011, 06:23 PM. Reason: added quote

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by gdoherty0102 View Post
              I feel that computers have about a 2-3 (perhaps 4) year life. When your laptop starts to drag in a couple of years, do a fresh install with minimal installed on it, then put your money to a great desktop to link up with.
              Interesting approach... Don't you need a decent internet connection for this to work? You are going to send a lot of info back and forth, aren't you? Which can be the problem with a laptop (at least, with me it is).
              Martijn de Riet
              Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
              MdR Advies
              Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

              Comment


                #8
                I guess as a student I don't have anything that could be stolen from me as intellectual info, that is not already stolen (if it is good enough) by some of my professors. Is that your point mdradvies? In the future I hope I'll be using desktop in a studio but that a long time from now.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Nope, I was talking about a much more practical problem: bandwith...
                  I (think I) recall an article about using Remote Desktop applications with Revit some time ago. They need a fair amount of data exchange, which can cause irritating lags when you're on a not-so-good internet connection... (let alone the crappy stuff they sell as "mobile internet" these days)
                  Martijn de Riet
                  Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                  MdR Advies
                  Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

                  Comment


                    #10
                    dilomo, I think you're getting a little side-tracked by some well-meaning comments. If you need the portability of a laptop, and can only afford one computer right now, get the best laptop you can afford, and forget about the desktop.

                    1. Up to you on what it's worth... the FirePro 5950M video card is noticeably better, but the GF 540M is okay.

                    3. The i5-2520 and i7-2620 are very fast for most Revit tasks, but will definitely be slower in renderings (quad core vs. dual core). If you're doing a lot of rendering presentation work, the quad will come in handy. And for the size projects you'll probably be working on, I don't think you'll notice a huge difference for other stuff (other than rendering).

                    Good luck with your studies!
                    Last edited by iru69; September 20, 2011, 02:52 AM.

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X