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    Revit Build Help

    Hey guys,
    I'm gonna build some workstations (Pre-builts are overpriced) for my Dad's office, they primarily use AutoCAD and Revit and I need some help on picking out the parts
    1. Is Revit more CPU or GPU intensive?
    2. How well does Ryzen (the 1700x specifically) perform in Revit?

    I'm not super concerned about AutoCAD, as it's not nearly as demanding as Revit

    If you can't help, I would really appreciate it if you could direct me to someone who could

    #2
    moving this post to the Hardware and Infrastructure sub-forum...
    Last edited by LeanneZ; August 7, 2017, 01:53 PM.
    Leanne Zaras, CDT, LEED AP
    AutoCAD 2010 Certified Professional / Revit Architecture 2012 Certified Professional / Revit Structure 2015 Certified Professional
    ACAD2021, RST2014-2021 / Windows 10, 64-bit

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by GusJansen View Post
      1. Is Revit more CPU or GPU intensive?
      2. How well does Ryzen (the 1700x specifically) perform in Revit?
      To answer those two questions:
      1. CPU by a LONG shot.
      2. Looking at some recent benchmarks and testing on my own, the Ryzens are performing adequately, but still SIGNIFICANTLY slower than the similarly priced i7-7700k. I wouldn't use a Ryzen unless I did a significant amount of CPU rendering.

      Comment


        #4
        Hi,

        Depending on the budget I would go with Intel i7 7700k processors. If you needed to save money then probably the i5 7600k (clock speed even if not overclocking). Ryzen is great but the clock speeds are not great. If you guys do a lot of renders, consider maybe just one or two Ryzen based systems but go intel on the others. If cost is a factor, The 1600x might be a better Revit CPU than the 1700x for clock speed.

        For Revit you wont need anything fancy for video cards either but I would try for Nvidia GTX 1060 6GB cards for the gpu ram.

        Hope that helps a bit
        Remis Computer Solutions
        Las Vegas, NV
        www.remiscs.com

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by remiscs View Post
          Hi,

          Depending on the budget I would go with Intel i7 7700k processors. If you needed to save money then probably the i5 7600k (clock speed even if not overclocking). Ryzen is great but the clock speeds are not great. If you guys do a lot of renders, consider maybe just one or two Ryzen based systems but go intel on the others. If cost is a factor, The 1600x might be a better Revit CPU than the 1700x for clock speed.

          For Revit you wont need anything fancy for video cards either but I would try for Nvidia GTX 1060 6GB cards for the gpu ram.

          Hope that helps a bit

          Thanks, for a $2000 rig, I was thinking of a 7820x and 1060 6gb, with 32 gbs of ram, and a 7800x, same 1060 6gb and 16gbs of ram for a $1500 rig I'm assuming these will be good for Revit?

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by remiscs View Post
            Hi,

            Depending on the budget I would go with Intel i7 7700k processors. If you needed to save money then probably the i5 7600k (clock speed even if not overclocking). Ryzen is great but the clock speeds are not great. If you guys do a lot of renders, consider maybe just one or two Ryzen based systems but go intel on the others. If cost is a factor, The 1600x might be a better Revit CPU than the 1700x for clock speed.

            For Revit you wont need anything fancy for video cards either but I would try for Nvidia GTX 1060 6GB cards for the gpu ram.

            Hope that helps a bit

            Ok, how do the 7800x and 7820x perform? I was going to OC them a little bit, but nothing major

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by GusJansen View Post
              Thanks, for a $2000 rig, I was thinking of a 7820x and 1060 6gb, with 32 gbs of ram, and a 7800x, same 1060 6gb and 16gbs of ram for a $1500 rig I'm assuming these will be good for Revit?
              Unless you guys plan on doing renders often or simulation, seriously the 7700k is your best CPU right now. Pair it with 32GB of ram (2x16GB modules) and a GTX 1060 6GB or P2000 Quadro. Maybe one with a Quadro and one with a GTX 1060 6GB (that way you have at least one quadro should you find out a software feature needs it there is one in the building).

              If you will do CPU renders often I would even consider a Ryzen 1800x 8 core as it is a render beast for the money. In a Vray benchmark It completed the benchmark at 1min10seconds vs a 7700k in 2min15seconds or so. I have screenshots. Adding to that a 24core workstation did the same render in 36 seconds which was $4400 in CPU alone a year ago when I built it.

              So if you guys can afford it and do not do a ton of renders just get the 7700k. If you needed to save money I would consider a 1600x ryzen but if your going to spend about $300 on a CPU and do not need a lot of rendering power the 7700k is the way to go.

              (edit: oh nevermind, I see the 1800x is not on sale anymore. They were about $350 when I got one. Otherwise the 1700x would be the next suggestion. I have played with a 1600x, 1700, 1700x and 1800x)
              Last edited by remiscs; August 14, 2017, 02:13 AM.
              Remis Computer Solutions
              Las Vegas, NV
              www.remiscs.com

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by remiscs View Post
                Unless you guys plan on doing renders often or simulation, seriously the 7700k is your best CPU right now. Pair it with 32GB of ram (2x16GB modules) and a GTX 1060 6GB or P2000 Quadro. Maybe one with a Quadro and one with a GTX 1060 6GB (that way you have at least one quadro should you find out a software feature needs it there is one in the building).

                If you will do CPU renders often I would even consider a Ryzen 1800x 8 core as it is a render beast for the money. In a Vray benchmark It completed the benchmark at 1min10seconds vs a 7700k in 2min15seconds or so. I have screenshots. Adding to that a 24core workstation did the same render in 36 seconds which was $4400 in CPU alone a year ago when I built it.

                So if you guys can afford it and do not do a ton of renders just get the 7700k. If you needed to save money I would consider a 1600x ryzen but if your going to spend about $300 on a CPU and do not need a lot of rendering power the 7700k is the way to go.

                (edit: oh nevermind, I see the 1800x is not on sale anymore. They were about $350 when I got one. Otherwise the 1700x would be the next suggestion. I have played with a 1600x, 1700, 1700x and 1800x)
                Yeah, this makes sense, they do a lot of rendering where I work, so I could go with Ryzen, but it seems like they do other stuff too. So I'll think about pricing some rigs that are cheaper than $1500 with less enthusiast grade CPU's, but it seems like the intel CPU's have better single-thread performance, and AMD has more cores for the money, making them better at rendering, but with something like the 7820x, I get 16 threads, so it'll be good for rendering, and and intel CPU, which makes it better for single-core performance, especially if I overclock the rigs a little bit

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by GusJansen View Post
                  Yeah, this makes sense, they do a lot of rendering where I work, so I could go with Ryzen, but it seems like they do other stuff too. So I'll think about pricing some rigs that are cheaper than $1500 with less enthusiast grade CPU's, but it seems like the intel CPU's have better single-thread performance, and AMD has more cores for the money, making them better at rendering, but with something like the 7820x, I get 16 threads, so it'll be good for rendering, and and intel CPU, which makes it better for single-core performance, especially if I overclock the rigs a little bit
                  Well, this really all comes down to budget. You need to get with the owner or whoever is making the financial decisions and see what you have to work with and what their expectation is. Just remember to balance all the components, not just put it all in the CPU. Get a good amount of SSD storage, RAM, modular power supplies (easy to replace if they fail without re-wiring the system), etc.

                  If you have a local PC shop consider what power supplies you can walk in and get, things like that.

                  I would not overclock the system unless you are very comfortable with that process and plan to run thorough stress testing before putting it into the field.

                  Good luck!
                  Remis Computer Solutions
                  Las Vegas, NV
                  www.remiscs.com

                  Comment

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