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    Dell Xps L502X-Processor Question

    Hello all,
    I will soon be buying a new computer,

    I will get a Dell XPS 15 L502X with the new SandyBridge Processors.

    Here is a link that shows all of the availible processors for this computer: http://configure.us.dell.com/dellsto...l_id=xps-l502x

    I am looking at the i7-2620QM, it is a Quad core, Is this a good choice??

    Is 2.0GHz too slow even with turbo boost up to 2.9GHz??

    I really don't want to spend anymore money than I would for the i7-2639QM, if anymore at all,

    So I guess I want to know if it is really any better than the dual core i5's also available for this laptop??

    I don't have too large of Revit files, just single family homes and some light Commercial buildings.

    P.S. Please don't suggest another computer, I need a laptop and i am going to get this one! And I am using revit Architecture 2012.

    Thanks in advance,

    Thomas

    #2
    I'd step up to the i7-2620M, or back down to the i5-2520M. Processor SPEED(GHz) is what's important in Revit, not the number of cores. The i5-2520M would likely feel faster than, or at least just as fast as, the i7-2630QM.

    The turbo boost speed is the speed you should look at. Revit will push the processor enough to take full advantage of it.

    Comment


      #3
      Hello,

      Thank you for the reply.

      I am also wondering about rendering times, I assume the Quad (i7-2630QM) would be better in that category, is that true??

      And would there be a big difference in render time between the i7-2630QM and the i5-2520??

      Thanks again,

      Thomas

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by tf9 View Post
        Hello,

        Thank you for the reply.

        I am also wondering about rendering times, I assume the Quad (i7-2630QM) would be better in that category, is that true??

        And would there be a big difference in render time between the i7-2630QM and the i5-2520??

        Thanks again,

        Thomas
        The i7 would dominate the i5 in rendering times. Could be up to 50% faster with two extra cores. But it depends on the type of rendering you're doing as to what is the best value. If you're animating, the i7 is a no-brainer. If you're just doing still frame, lower res shots, the i5 may suit you just fine.

        Comment


          #5
          I do just basic still frame renderings in Revit at up to medium quality.

          So, The i5 sounds like it should be just fine for my needs, and could save me $85!??

          Thank you for all of your help,

          Thomas

          Comment


            #6
            Based on stated needs, this would be my recommendation from most desirable to least desirable:
            i7-2820QM
            i7-2720QM
            i7-2620M
            i5-2520M
            i7-2630QM
            i5-2410M

            If this is for school and little side projects (or occasionally working from home), get what you can afford. If this is for "business", I think it would be short-sighted to make decisions based on $75.

            Comment


              #7
              Ok,

              Thank you all for your help,

              I am going to go with the i5-2520M.

              One more question though, well actually two.

              1) just wanted to verify that a 1 gig video card is good enough for Revit, no need for 2 gigs is there??

              2) Is 6 gigs of RAM good for revit or should I go for 8 gigs?? Is it worth $60 for 2 extra gigs??

              Thomas

              Comment


                #8
                The amount of memory a video card has is fairly unimportant past 1GB and you certainly aren't going to notice much difference between the two cards listed on the dell link you posted. Neither card is that great, but they'll do for smaller projects.

                6GB is fine for smaller projects, but definitely go for as much as you can afford if you ever plan on working on anything larger than a house.

                Comment

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