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    Got a SSD and plenty of RAM?

    Just formatted my computer last night, to re-install Win7 and the new Premium Suite.
    Quite a shock that my 80GB SSD drive was almost nearly full, leaving only little space for PS, MS Office, etc.

    Had a look around on the HD, and found that the hibernation file was taking up 16 GB :banghead:

    After a quick Google search, I learned that by default in Windows 7, the size of the hibernation file (hiberfil.sys) will be the same as the amount of installed RAM on your computer. - Luckily I don´t have 80GB RAM, but only 16GB

    Never the less, this could be a real issue for many of us who´ve bought (small) SSD´s and massive amount of RAM to please Revit.

    There´s a tutorial here, on how to turn off or disable the hibernation, but the quick solution is to throw this line in a Command Promt: powercfg -h off and press Enter

    This will disable hibernation and delete the hibernation file (hiberfil.sys)
    Klaus Munkholm
    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

    #2
    Nice to know! I'll check my pc for that.
    Martijn de Riet
    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
    MdR Advies
    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
      Just formatted my computer last night, to re-install Win7 and the new Premium Suite.
      Quite a shock that my 80GB SSD drive was almost nearly full, leaving only little space for PS, MS Office, etc.

      Had a look around on the HD, and found that the hibernation file was taking up 16 GB :banghead:

      After a quick Google search, I learned that by default in Windows 7, the size of the hibernation file (hiberfil.sys) will be the same as the amount of installed RAM on your computer. - Luckily I don´t have 80GB RAM, but only 16GB

      Never the less, this could be a real issue for many of us who´ve bought (small) SSD´s and massive amount of RAM to please Revit.

      There´s a tutorial here, on how to turn off or disable the hibernation, but the quick solution is to throw this line in a Command Promt: powercfg -h off and press Enter

      This will disable hibernation and delete the hibernation file (hiberfil.sys)
      How do you like your SSD vs a HDD? Any advantages (Revit wise) that you have seen with it?

      Comment


        #4
        i cant find the article i read last week/month but this is pretty similar in the options / changes
        http://www.tweaktown.com/articles/31...de/index1.html

        see page 5 about "ssd tweaker" that puts all the options in one place for you

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          #5
          WAY faster in terms of reading and writing data. So anything that extensively uses the HDD (such as saving the file) is a treat.
          Martijn de Riet
          Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
          MdR Advies
          Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by gdoherty0102 View Post
            How do you like your SSD vs a HDD? Any advantages (Revit wise) that you have seen with it?
            Revit wise, it´s really only an advantage when opening Revit, my projects are kept on a network storage, so no difference in loading the projects, and no difference while working with Revit either.

            Opening Revit (and all other apps.), booting Windows, etc. is way faster though :beer:
            Klaus Munkholm
            "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
              Revit wise, it´s really only an advantage when opening Revit, my projects are kept on a network storage, so no difference in loading the projects, and no difference while working with Revit either.

              Opening Revit (and all other apps.), booting Windows, etc. is way faster though :beer:
              That's true, but for that reason I created a workfolder on my SSD which is backed up to the appropriate network folder. Why pay for a faster hdd and then not utilize it...
              Martijn de Riet
              Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
              MdR Advies
              Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

              Comment


                #8
                I haven't seen this to be the case. I've tested opening and saving Revit files on several different computers with SSDs, and the results have been just about identical. It's the CPU that makes the difference.

                But I'd be interested to hear if anyone has bench-marked opens and saves and gotten different results.

                Revit (along with most apps) does open faster from an SSD.

                Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
                So anything that extensively uses the HDD (such as saving the file) is a treat.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I am not sure if I have seen an impact on File open with an SSD, because the only machine with an SSD I tested on was also an i7 machine, so it could have easily been the CPU making the difference.

                  My gut tells me that with File Open being now being multi-threaded, a really fast quad core machine might be getting fast enough that the drive becomes the bottleneck and an SSD starts to matter. But the only way to test that would be to run a journal opening a really large local file, and test on both an SSD and HDD, where everything else is exactly the same, including the OS install, installed apps, drivers, everything. And to really validate the idea one would then want to artificially constrain the machine to a single core and lower clock speed, and test again on both drives. You could theoretically verify the SSD is faster by just having both an SSD an HDD as extra data drives, but the reality is that 99% of people with SSDs at all are going to have one, and also use it as their boot drive, so testing any other scenario seems pointless. Would that I had a new machine to play with like that.

                  Gordon
                  Pragmatic Praxis

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Gordon Price View Post
                    You could theoretically verify the SSD is faster by just having both an SSD an HDD as extra data drives, but the reality is that 99% of people with SSDs at all are going to have one, and also use it as their boot drive, so testing any other scenario seems pointless.
                    That's our setup. Same computer(s) (i7-870 quad) with both an SSD and a HDD. 70MB file. Open copy 1 on SSD. Open copy 2 on HDD. Save copy 1 on SSD. Save copy 2 on HDD. Single core CPU spikes to 100% (/Edit). I didn't create rigorous journal testing, but I don't think the point is whether there's a half-second difference here and there. Point being, that if you're buying an SSD for faster file open/saves, you're going to be disappointed (based on my results).

                    p.s. our computers generally have both because we order stock HP/Dell's that come with HDD and then I add aftermarket SSDs. Have a new computer setup on the way with the latest and greatest Intel 500 series SSD, so will see in a couple weeks if an even faster SSD makes a difference... I'm betting not.
                    Last edited by iru69; July 6, 2011, 12:16 AM. Reason: corrected second guessing of my own results on CPU usage.

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