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    Need help with splitting geometry

    I'm building a graph to allow us to run some analysis on a sculptural form for which we are designing supports. I'm having issues trying to sub-divide the geometry in Dynamo in order to calculate weights and centroids.

    I have a Revit model provided from the architect, which I'm not able to edit in Revit as I believe it is imported geometry from another tool.

    So far I've set up my graph to allow me to pick faces in the Revit model to create Dynamo surfaces which I thicken and join in order to be able to calculate the centroid of the element. (All pieces will be made of the same material).

    Now we'd like to split up the element into a series of 18" wide strips to determine the weight of each strip. I'm using the Springs SplitRecursively node and it is almost doing what I want, and I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong. It is dividing all the geometry up, but certain segments are all getting grouped together with one strip of the subdivided geometry.

    Can anyone offer any insight into what I'm messing up here with the way I'm using the SplitRecursively node?

    incorrect division.PNG
    Attached Files

    #2
    So i havent fully wrapped my head around the logi in the top portion of the graph, so far... But if i try it on many of the pieces in your sculpture, i see that they are returning Empty Lists to the Python Inputs in the final section. That doesnt happen, of course, if we run it on a much more simplified surface, like the face of a typical square wall.

    All of that to say, even though i dont fully understand the intent of the logic, it definitely isnt "always sending the data" that it appears it is supposed to send. And, since the Splitter is downstrream, im going to wager a guess that this is part of the problem. Unless the issue i am seeing is just how i tested it...
    Attached Files
    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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      #3
      Two more quick things that jumped out at me:

      1. These are all planar and flat. So you can avoid a lot of the drama at the beginning, with the Springs nodes and selecting the faces, by simply remodeling and tracing these things in to either a regular family, or even a wall type with a specific thickness, and using these shapes as the profile edits. Works really quick.

      2. Right now, you cal out the min X and Min Z of all points on any given panel (which makes sense, to start the subdividing). But then you tell it to SET INTERSECTION. Thats only going to fly on panels where the bottom left point IS the min for both X and Z, as it is in this panel i did in the screen shot. For a bunch of the other shapes, that logic returns nothing, because the lowest Z point very well may not be at the lowest X point. I THINK what you wanted to do was get the point VALUES at min x and min z, and make a new starting point there? Does that make sense?
      Attached Files
      Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
      @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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        #4
        Yep (i think). Getting rid of Set Intersection and just always using MIN X, it now seems to work on every panel ive tried so far.
        Attached Files
        Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
        @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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          #5
          Thanks for taking a look! I tried annotating a screenshot of the graph to hopefully make my logic a little more clear.

          My intent with selecting the surfaces was to select all surfaces at once, to allow calculating of the centroid of the entire shape before sub-dividing.

          I can see what you're saying about remodeling. I was initially thinking it might be good to have the selection tool because a) there are more panels than the one I've included here, and b) it sounds like there may be several more iterations on the panel shape coming. I was hoping having a selection workflow would save time in the long run. You're right though that this wouldn't be too hard to re-model so maybe that does make more sense.

          I'm using the min X and Min Z because my intent was to be working on a single solid formed by joining all the thickened surfaces.

          I'll test out removing the set intersection and just selecting one panel at a time. If it works that way then maybe I can group them after subdividing to calculate the centroid.
          Attached Files

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            #6
            oooooh, i assumed you were subdividing EACH panel in to pieces, alone, and that you just wanted Dynamo to do them all at once.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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              #7
              I still think its close, and we can get it there. Even with multiple panels at once, im not sure Set Intersection is the right choice, because i feel like there IS a chance they arent reporting the same point.
              Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
              @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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                #8
                Yeah, so it works here with all faces at the same time, using just MIN X instead of set intersection.
                Attached Files
                Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Kate View Post
                  Now we'd like to split up the element into a series of 18" wide strips to determine the weight of each strip.
                  You can create parts, then divide them at once using Intersecting References.


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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Nurlan View Post

                    You can create parts, then divide them at once using Intersecting References.
                    They cant be parted. They are Generic Model Instances (not families, and not IPF's) made from Direct Shapes.
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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