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Thread: Models for rendering purpose vs all in one models (model management)

  1. #1
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    Models for rendering purpose vs all in one models (model management)

    I'm just curious to find out how you approach your rendering from a model management perspective. We have a few teams doing different things in our office, my personal view is that the model is for the production of construction information.

    If/when renders are needed, which they often are, then any modification, additions etc to achieve suitable renders should be done in a different model, ie; the render should not effect/impact on drawing production.

    Am I being unrealistic? Is it over kill? How do you do this in your workflow?

    The reason I ask is because I witnessed someone raise a floor by a few mm because the structural model floor was overlapping at the same elevatio, rather than investigating why there are 2 floors at the same elevation and turning off/unloading the linked model. I also just ran of a set of pdf's followed by an email asking what some of those weird objects were (light sources and 3d model text). Our models are for drawing production which in turn for the contract, imo these should not be tempered with unless it is relevant for the production of drawings.

  2. #2
    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    Rendering is usually more marketing/sales than construction. The path you are on can fork down one or the other. While you're trying to convince the client to build it, or get permission to build it from a city/town you've got to create a story and images that convince people its the right thing to do,what they want to do. The construction documentation process obviously is a very different story and purpose.

    As such I see no conflict with a model being separated if necessary so the story can be told well...otherwise there is no construction process to pursue. If we can keep it all together I'd see it as a win but we can't let it derail getting the project through completion.
    cganiere likes this.

  3. #3
    Moderator cellophane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve_Stafford View Post
    Rendering is usually more marketing/sales than construction. The path you are on can fork down one or the other. While you're trying to convince the client to build it, or get permission to build it from a city/town you've got to create a story and images that convince people its the right thing to do,what they want to do. The construction documentation process obviously is a very different story and purpose.

    As such I see no conflict with a model being separated if necessary so the story can be told well...otherwise there is no construction process to pursue. If we can keep it all together I'd see it as a win but we can't let it derail getting the project through completion.
    The issue with splitting it out is you end up with people making changes in a rendering model that are either impossible in the real world (can't be built) or elements in the model don't end up in the counterpart. Most common things I've seen are excluding MEP equipment from renderings and fluff details being added in for a rendering but not actually being a real thing in the building. Both have the potential for problems down the line. "Well the image you showed us a year ago had a 200 foot cantilever, and now you have columns everywhere. That isn't what we approved!"

  4. #4
    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    Quote Originally Posted by cellophane
    The issue with splitting it out is you end up with people making changes in a rendering model that are either impossible in the real world (can't be built) or elements in the model don't end up in the counterpart. Most common things I've seen are excluding MEP equipment from renderings and fluff details being added in for a rendering but not actually being a real thing in the building. Both have the potential for problems down the line. "Well the image you showed us a year ago had a 200 foot cantilever, and now you have columns everywhere. That isn't what we approved!"
    Sure it is an issue. I can't recall ever seeing a rendering that got shared with a client that includes all the blemishes the building will have because of where it really sits in the neighborhood and how the mechanical equipment etc. will have to be positioned.

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    Forum Addict sdbrownaia's Avatar
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    I think the big industry change is VR and enscape which in my opinion makes it important to build your model "render ready". so I'm a proponent of not using multiple models. But sometimes this is necessary.

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    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdbrownaia View Post
    I think the big industry change is VR and enscape which in my opinion makes it important to build your model "render ready". so I'm a proponent of not using multiple models. But sometimes this is necessary.
    This. I would NEVER tell someone the model is for "documents only." So much wasted opportunity.
    GMcDowellJr likes this.

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    Forum Addict elton williams's Avatar
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    We use enscape a lot, it's awesome, but it's not yet good enough to produce high level marketing images which typically adds hours and hours worth of entourage, mood lighting and post processing work.
    Having said that, our renderers cry every time we send them our 'render ready' revit models (even with a bunch of categories turned off), mostly because of the sheer number of polygons revit produces, made worse by the way curved surfaces are interpreted.
    So, we don't produce a second model for rendering, but our renderers do and that still costs $$.


    *enscape
    Last edited by elton williams; February 8th, 2019 at 07:02 AM.

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    Forum Addict GMcDowellJr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elton williams View Post
    mSo, we don't produce a second model for rendering, but our renderers do and that still costs $$.
    You should look at what renders like LiFang are doing. The way they pull renderings to life without needing to remodel is amazballs.

    There’s a video on his site somewhere that shows how they do post in PShop that’s more like painting than rendering.

    Oh, and they’re wicked fast.
    Nurlan likes this.

  9. #9
    Forum Addict elton williams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
    You should look at what renders like LiFang are doing. The way they pull renderings to life without needing to remodel is amazballs.

    There’s a video on his site somewhere that shows how they do post in PShop that’s more like painting than rendering.

    Oh, and they’re wicked fast.
    Cheers, I'll check it out

  10. #10
    Member mjajansen's Avatar
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    The architect i work for now uses an extra fase (the last one) for all rendering objects, so you don't see that stuff in documentation. The rendering is done in Enscape and that's good enough for their business.
    Munkholm likes this.

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