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Thread: How to read imperial units?

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    How to read imperial units?

    Hi

    On a daily basis I use metric units, but I have a client to whom I need to create a project using imperials.

    While the basics are pretty straightforward, 1 foot (') = 12 inches ("), in Revit I can see some magical creations, such as 2' 0 15/16".

    Can anyone explain to me please how should I interpret that? Does that mean 2 feet and 15/16 of the inch (approx 23.8125 mm) = 633.4125mm?

    Thanks!

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    Senior Member Andres Franco's Avatar
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    well imperial units are a little bit quirky LOL , but if you want to not suffer within it you can translate the units directly in Revit, I mean, you have some options to play with, First, you can model you building in metric units and change the units at the moment you need or want, secondly you can translate directly in Revit while drawing that means that if your project is in Imperial Units you can enter your metric units directly in the value box (I dot know its exact name in English sorry for that ), which means that even if Revit is in metric or imperial units you can enter different values in different units and Revit will make an automatic translation , hope this help

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    Moderator DaveP's Avatar
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    Watch the spaces in an Imperial dimension
    2' 0 15/16"
    is read as
    2 feet
    0 inches
    15/16 of an inch

    You will also often see a dash between the feet and inches
    2'-0 15/16"
    If there is not a fraction, it's just feet and inches, but if the "inches" part is less than one inche, it will always have a 0 and a space before the fraction

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    DaveP, thank you for clear explanation.

    What is the difference between 2' 0 15/16" and 2'-0 15/16" ??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andres Franco View Post
    First, you can model you building in metric units and change the units at the moment you need or want, secondly you can translate directly in Revit while drawing that means that if your project is in Imperial Units you can enter your metric units directly in the value box (...)
    The trick is that the product must be delivered in Imperial Units and CAD files provided by client are also in Imperial Units. I'd rather stick to it to avoid discrepancies, although I'm a big fan of metric units!
    cganiere likes this.

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    Senior Member Andres Franco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paidpal View Post
    The trick is that the product must be delivered in Imperial Units and CAD files provided by client are also in Imperial Units. I'd rather stick to it to avoid discrepancies, although I'm a big fan of metric units!
    so, you can change the units, work in metric and at the moment to send the model to your client you just need to change your units again that way your model will be always set in the correct units, and for the plans send by the client in imperial units, you can use the method I've already explained above without problems
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    Forum Addict josephpeel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveP View Post
    Watch the spaces in an Imperial dimension
    2' 0 15/16" is read as 2 feet 0 inches 15/16 of an inch.
    You will also often see a dash between the feet and inches 2'-0 15/16"
    If there is not a fraction, it's just feet and inches, but if the "inches" part is less than one inche, it will always have a 0 and a space before the fraction
    FFS thats retarded....
    "Hey, since lengths are scalar quantities lets not represent them as a Number, that can be understood by any other person/program as a Number, lets use a random mix of numbers, text characters, mathematical operators and characters used to start and end strings. No need to join the rest of the world in that new fangled base ten system of units, that will work just fine!"

    It would actually make more sense to write feet and inches in Hexadecimal..
    elton williams likes this.

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    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andres Franco View Post
    so, you can change the units, work in metric and at the moment to send the model to your client you just need to change your units again that way your model will be always set in the correct units, and for the plans send by the client in imperial units, you can use the method I've already explained above without problems
    Something to think about: does the project need to be delivered in Imperial because it's actually getting built or purchases in a location that uses Imperial units?

    If so, working in metric and converting won't fly. Materials are different sizes and thicknesses, where the units are different. And that 2'-0 15/16" is BECAUSE of the direct conversion. I'll bet dollars to donuts they don't want it to be that value when they see it.

    If it's truly an Imperial units Project, you'll probably need your libraries to be acclimated to Imperial. Wall types, ceiling types, door sizes, material thicknesses, etc.

    And yes. Imperial units are idiotic. All the smart people here stuck using them agree with you.

    Sent from my Phablet. Please excuse typos... and bad ideas.

    Aaron Maller
    Director
    Parallax Team, Inc.
    iru69 likes this.

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    Moderator DaveP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paidpal View Post
    DaveP, thank you for clear explanation.

    What is the difference between 2' 0 15/16" and 2'-0 15/16" ??
    Nothing.
    You'll just sometimes see it expressed one way, sometimes the other.
    But they both mean the same thing.

    (BTW, I completely agree with the sentiment here. The US is foolishly sticking with an obsolete, clumsy system)
    paidpal likes this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
    If so, working in metric and converting won't fly. Materials are different sizes and thicknesses, where the units are different. And that 2'-0 15/16" is BECAUSE of the direct conversion. I'll bet dollars to donuts they don't want it to be that value when they see it.

    If it's truly an Imperial units Project, you'll probably need your libraries to be acclimated to Imperial. Wall types, ceiling types, door sizes, material thicknesses, etc.
    This is what is typically meant by "soft" and "hard" units conversion - which is actually closer to "conversion" (just convert the units to the other system - 1/2" becomes 12.7mm) or "substitution" (switch the part sizes for actually available parts - 1/2" becomes 12mm). You should be aware of which situation you are documenting for.

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