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Thread: Area plan as occupancy plan and schedule

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    Area plan as occupancy plan and schedule

    Here’s a perfect example of when the old forum posts would come in handy, as I know this topic exists…
    I know there are people who use area plans to create their room occupancy plans and schedules. Does anyone want to shed some light on this topic? How do you set it up? Where do I start? I want to include this plan, schedule, (and I guess Area Scheme) in our office template. In previous projects I was just using a room schedule and had schedule tables and key schedules setup with default code values. Will I need to recreate all of that work? Is there a good way to do code analysis and occupancy types with area plans?

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    Forum Co-Founder Alfredo Medina's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by t1shep View Post
    Here’s a perfect example of when the old forum posts would come in handy, as I know this topic exists…...
    Tell me about it... we have to start everything from scratch... but let me try to ignore that and move on...

    The solution involves several topics such as calculated values in schedules, project parameters for the room entities, etc. I think you can do it with room entities, not necesarily with area entities, but it is possible with both. Perhaps if you provide more detail about how the final schedule needs to be, we could explain the solution step by step.

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    I have done that very thing in my own template, but it's been so long I don't remember all the steps. If you have done it already with rooms, it should be very similar. In fact, if you have created project parameters such as "Occupancy Classification" for your room schedule, you should be able to modify the same parameter to also apply to areas.

    You will need to have a base area plan already established as area schedules are specific to a given area plan. It's almost like it's a schedule that only works for one view.

    So create an area plan with probably at least one area, and name it appropriately and keep it in your template so you can schedule it. On Revit 2009, you go Settings>Area & Volume Computations, then click the Area Schemes tab to define a new area format. Here is where I name it, like "Occupancies" or "Occupant Loads." Do this before creating your area plan so you can select it from a drop-down during the area plan creation process.

    For code summaries I use both area and room plans. Every room and space within a building has its own individual Occupancy Classification. To identify these a room schedule works best. But portions of a building enclosed by exterior walls, fire walls, or fire barriers are assigned an Occupancy Classification for this entire area based on most restrictive occupancy, and I will use an area plan to show this. This is useful for identifying areas as calculated for Allowable Building Heights and Areas.

    Occupant loads are identified independently from Occupancy Classification. Occupant loads are based on the "Function of Space" so I use a different Area Plan "type" (or scheme or whatever). The area plan can be useful for describing occupant loads for exiting when you have a portion of a building that is evaluated under a "Gross" area calculation rather than net. My interpretation of the code is that for any occupant load calculation based on "Gross" floor area per occupant, this area is calculated in the same way gross areas are calculated for Chapter 5, so stairways, closets, restrooms, etc. shall be considered to determine occupant load. Here I can cover a portion of a building including offices, corridors, and restrooms with a single area, identify the "Function of Space" as "Business areas" and calculate the occupant load for the entire area.

    Hope this gets you started. This is not as specific, detailed, or accurate as I would like but my time is limited. It really is a shame that we have to rebuild so much work...

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    Member jsnyder's Avatar
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    Assuming that you want to use Revit to schedule and calculate Occupancy Loads, you will probably want to be using area plans as noted above since the "function of space" code concept almost always spans multiple rooms (depends on your project, obviously). We have tags that report the Function of Space, Occupancy Load Factor, SF and finally the Occupant Load for the tagged area.

    The trick is to realize that Revit tags do not report calculated values (the Occupant Load) directly from schedules. In the Occupancy Schedule (Area Schedule), you have to add a column where you manually transpose the calculated value to a number that you just type in - the typed in value is the one that shows up in the tag - along with the other values which are instance parameters for each area. I don't mind this for a couple of reasons in this particular case:
    1. It forces someone to actually look at the information rather than assuming every number is correct.
    2. It lets that person properly round up numbers as required for code compliance (Occ Load of 3.2 gets rounded up to 4 in our office).

    We do not take it any farther than that yet, i.e. calculating exit widths and path distances, but you probably could with a bit of gumption and spare time.
    Last edited by jsnyder; December 10th, 2010 at 06:34 PM.

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    Thank you everyone for your responses...
    What I'm trying to accomplish is my occupancy load calculations, egress widths, and plumbing fixture counts. I understand I need to create schedules, calculated values, etc....
    Part 1 of my questions is: are area plans the way to go as you can define an area that is independent of the room (for calcs based off of net vs. gross) or areas that incorporate more than one room, as has been indicated? As I said, I've done this with room schedules, but as I am making an update to our office template and standard, I'm wondering if area plans and schemes are the better way to go?
    Part 2 is like this: is it easy to convert my old room occupancy schedules into area schedules and what are the differences between them if they're different. Or...does anyone have this done that is willing to share?

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    Administrator Munkholm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsnyder View Post
    Location:AUGI Refugee
    that´s a good one !
    Hope it´s OK that all members of this forum are now "AUGI Refugee´s"

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    Member jsnyder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munkholm View Post
    that´s a good one !
    Hope it´s OK that all members of this forum are now "AUGI Refugee´s"
    Indeed. This forum is a bit like a refugee camp of sorts. Thank you most kindly for setting it up. It feels a lot more like home than that other place does anyway.

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    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by t1shep View Post
    Thank you everyone for your responses...
    What I'm trying to accomplish is my occupancy load calculations, egress widths, and plumbing fixture counts. I understand I need to create schedules, calculated values, etc....
    Part 1 of my questions is: are area plans the way to go as you can define an area that is independent of the room (for calcs based off of net vs. gross) or areas that incorporate more than one room, as has been indicated? As I said, I've done this with room schedules, but as I am making an update to our office template and standard, I'm wondering if area plans and schemes are the better way to go?
    Part 2 is like this: is it easy to convert my old room occupancy schedules into area schedules and what are the differences between them if they're different. Or...does anyone have this done that is willing to share?
    Areas are a better way to go (in theory) because of what you guys have already mentioned... Areas span multiple rooms. However, they also work like a complete and total bag of disaster, since you cant automatically define areas like you can rooms. All you can automatically define is the EXTERIOR area boundaries, so youre left tracing the interiors. I want walls to have TWO instance parameters: Bounds rooms, Bounds areas. Done.

    But yes, you can do EVERYTHING youre after, its just a TON of formulas, and calculated values, and shared parameters. You do still haveto manually transpose one columns (assuming you want the occupancies in a tag), but its no big deal. An additional calculated value, and a conditional formatting, and you have a great "alarm" system that will alert you when the area/room changes, and its no longer the same as your manually transposed column.

    How EASY is it to turn it from a room to an area schedule? Not hard at all. You just make a new one, and retype the formulas, LOL.

    FWIW, i had this all as an area schedule in my old office, and we have it as rooms now. It OVER calculates a little, since it adds up room by room, according to use. But i prefer that, to drawing in every interior walls area boundary. Screw that. The MINOR inconsistancies of SF numbers and counts arent that severe.

    EDIT: But expanding on that, yes: It can do everything you want. We have two key schedules, for Occupancy Classification and Building Usage. When theyre both filled in, it inputs values and calculates Plumbing fixture counts, egress width requirements, and occupants, etc.

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    Maybe someone could share how they do plumbing calcs??? Please!

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    Plumbing Calc

    I'll give you two examples of families to provide plumbing calc's based on IPC. I have created a separate family for each type of occupancy classification, that way it will work for mixed occupancies. Load family into project and provide the number of men and women as instance parameters.

    Pat
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Patrick; December 17th, 2010 at 08:23 PM.

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