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Thread: Best fonts for annotation

  1. #31
    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
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    Agreed. Annotation Styles is one of the few things AutoCAD just flat out handles BETTER than Revit does. No comparison.
    d.stairmand likes this.

  2. #32
    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    I've suggested a Project Font a few times in the past. I imagine each element that uses a font would have the regular list of fonts to choose from but also a <Project Font> in the list (at the top) choice. Choosing that would tell Revit to assign the font that is assigned to the Project Font setting which I'd expect to find under Additional Settings or perhaps the Options Dialog itself (Big R > Options).

  3. #33
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    Alex Cunningham's Avatar
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    Some people should get more involved with the Autodesk Beta programs.
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  4. #34
    Forum Co-Founder iru69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
    For me, frankly... The font discussion is non-value-adding. I just dont believe (in my heart of heart) that it matters much. Ive done architecture in Architext, Arial, Arial Narrow, AHand, RomanS, Calibri, and a Korean font i dont have the name too. All the buildings got built.
    I kind of agree on a conceptual level - it drives me a little batty when I see the use of techniques that look "cool", but don't make the drawings any more readable and just become a PITA. As an example, and I'm sure someone will disagree with me, but... right justified notes. They may look "streamlined" and "cleaner", but they're actually less readable, and it's a pain to move/copy notes around and then have to change the justification.

    Why the font matters? First, there ARE more readable fonts that are easier on the eyes in blocks of text. Arial and Calibri might not make a difference, but some are pretty bad. And it's a valid discussion of something like "Arial" vs. a hand-drafted font. I've actually used hand-drafted fonts for the last ten years, and while it's an anachronistic idea, and by themselves, they're more difficult to read, there is an argument to be made that on a drawing of generally straight lines, they separate themselves out from the building. It's why I prefer curved leader lines - you generally won't confuse them with the lines that represent the building. I've never had the opportunity to try it, but I would generally support sentence case for notation.

    But some it may depends on what kind of architecture you do, or where you practice. I can understand on larger sized commercial projects that a lot of it's keynoting and callouts to other sheets. I seen a number of the 100+ sheet sets, and a lot of the sheets are pretty "empty". As you suggested, most of your notes are on the details.

    But I practice mostly residential architecture - a lot of custom single-family homes. Our sheets are flooded with notes. The building dept. requires an ungodly amount of "notes"... you end up over-notating ridiculous code information because every freaking plan reviewer (along with the half-dozen localities each with their own bldg. dept. that we regularly work with) has their little pet "correction" - you didn't notate the CFM of the bathroom fan, you didn't notate the handrail is 36" high on the plan, you didn't call out the water heater is strapped down, I could go on and on. You'd think you could put those kind of general notes on a general note sheet, but there's always a plan reviewer who doesn't see it. Then you have all the little design notes so that the Owner doesn't think you forgot that's where they're going to put the dog food or that's where the kids store their backpacks. Then you have all the construction notes, calling out that this or that needs to be centered or aligned, when anyone with half a brain would know that's the intention just by looking at, but you get burned by the framer who's not paying attention, so now you have to make a note for every little thing. It's a lot of freaking notes... and every year, it's more and more! So now we're wasting a lot of time moving notes around on the sheet (or moving drawings to other sheets), trying to get them to fit and stay readable. And that's costing time. Which means if a more compact font will actually save us time, it matters.

    But it's not just a font issue. I'm also trying to tackle what we do put on the sheets. I was reviewing a contract set today (drafted by others in our office) and I was noting how much extra verbiage was being used. As a simple example, there were a lot of notes pointing to dashed lines that read "line of roof above". We can see it's a line! "roof above" is all that's needed, LOL.
    therrien and koolair like this.

  5. #35
    Forum Addict elton williams's Avatar
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    I'm a little late to this discussion but for us, for Revit, it's 100% Arial Narrow.

  6. #36
    Member kowen1208's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iru69 View Post
    But I practice mostly residential architecture - a lot of custom single-family homes. Our sheets are flooded with notes. The building dept. requires an ungodly amount of "notes"...
    I've been in the exact same position. I remember one plan that probably 95% of my responses to the plan lengthy review were "See General Notes Sheet...". Pretty obvious they didn't even look at that sheet the first time around.

    To me, just about anything I can do to make the plans easier to read and navigate, whether it's an easy to read font or well-organized general notes sheet, is value added. It takes a lot to stand out to a contractor as having a really good set of plans, but if it gets you more work from that contractor, then it's well worth it.

  7. #37
    Member Chadwick17's Avatar
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    We changed our font to Calibri a couple years back. I've been trying to argue the point of moving to sentence case notes but I'm having a really hard time convincing anyone of that.

  8. #38
    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chadwick17
    ...I've been trying to argue the point of moving to sentence case notes but I'm having a really hard time convincing anyone of that...
    A lot of things don't change because people have given up asking or its just too subtle to push their buttons anymore.

    Create a sheet of general notes in both formats. Put them up in a public place (in the office) with a note that asks, "Which one would you prefer to read?" Tack up an envelope and provide slips of paper so people can vote for their preference. See what a month of voting produces. Also encourage PM's to ask clients/contractors that actually look at your documents to vote too... something like "Hey, you could help us with something. We've got this internal debate going on so we decided to get all democratic about it. Have a look and vote too?"

    Oh, don't be shocked when you get all sorts of other, even unrelated, suggestions as result...
    kowen1208 and Chadwick17 like this.

  9. #39
    Member kowen1208's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve_Stafford View Post
    Create a sheet of general notes in both formats. Put them up in a public place (in the office) with a note that asks, "Which one would you prefer to read?"...
    I would just caution to not come off as passive aggressive. At one of my previous employers, if I had done this without consulting my superior, and then bringing the trial to everyone's attention in staff meeting, it would have ruffled a lot of feathers. But I completely agree with the concept; we need to look at what we produce objectively and stop thinking that tradition is always right.

  10. #40
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    How ironic.....I hated all fonts when I started working in Revit. So, I didn't use any! I still use my own hand lettering and love it. My goal has always been to make Revit look like my old hand drawings. (Nobody can read it, but it looks great! LOL)
    Alex Cunningham likes this.

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