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Thread: Possible to Create A Typ Kitchen Family Using Only 2D Linework?

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    Junior Member tds1spydog's Avatar
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    Possible to Create A Typ Kitchen Family Using Only 2D Linework?

    Hi, I'm a knucklehead and I've inherited a large residential project with a shell and core model hosting a units model. The units are modeled with kitchen families using 2D elements. This works fine for "L" shaped or linear kitchens but "U" shaped kitchens, in elevation, end up showing linework "behind" as in front. The linework is drawn in the front reference plane.
    Is this simply a function of model and symbolic lines having visibility settings that show front/back? What's the best recommended workflow for this situation?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Possible to Create A Typ Kitchen Family Using Only 2D Linework?-u-kitchen-layout.jpg   Possible to Create A Typ Kitchen Family Using Only 2D Linework?-left-elev.jpg   Possible to Create A Typ Kitchen Family Using Only 2D Linework?-right-elev.jpg  

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    Senior Member Robin Deurloo's Avatar
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    If you really want to hear my recommendation than I would say get rid of the 2D stuff and model the kitchen in 3D.

    BUT in this case a as a quick fix maybe adding a simple extrusion on top of the 2D plan would be enough. It will hide the "behind" lines in the elevations and you still have the dashed lines visible.

    And go and find the one that made the kitchen and kick him in the nuts (even if it is a girl !)
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    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robin Deurloo View Post
    If you really want to hear my recommendation than I would say get rid of the 2D stuff and model the kitchen in 3D.
    This. Inexperienced Revit Folks try doing stuff in 2D, thinking itll be "lighter and faster," and they dont relaize how hard they hamstring the entire team. Model it all in 3D, all the problems go away.

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    Forum Addict GMcDowellJr's Avatar
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    I think the other issue here is doing it all in a single family rather than as individual cabinets and grouping them together.

    First thing I'd do, assuming you're not going to model them, is make sure it's a Generic Model and that you're issuing Model Lines. That might help... might not. If it doesn't, just model the damn things.


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    I typically run the opposite direction from manufacturer created Revit content and always build my own (including cabinets), but if you need something in a pinch, you might want to check out the millwork families from the Woodwork Institute. They have a bunch of revit content based on the WI Design Series.

    https://woodworkinstitute.com/archit...design-series/

    Jon
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    Junior Member tds1spydog's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of the feedback. This project is full of these 2D families(brought in from previous project where they didn't work either) - my response to supervisor was to model the kitchens. Relatively new to the office, facing a system well entrenched in its "standards" and trying to instituting better practices. Was specifically told not to try and change "the system". That's why I'm trying to make this current situation work yet prevent it from being carried to the next project. I'll model this one and move on. Thanks again-

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    Forum Addict GMcDowellJr's Avatar
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    Ask them what the system says about the issue you're facing. If they have a crap process then they can tell you how to resolve things with their system. If the system is broken (or never really worked) it needs to be fixed.


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    Quote Originally Posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
    ....then they can tell you how to resolve things with their system....
    Hahaha. I’d love to be a fly on the wall and listen to how they’d talk their way out of those problems. It would be very entertaining.

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    Junior Member tds1spydog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
    If the system is broken (or never really worked) it needs to be fixed.
    Lots of fixing to be done. A BEP has never been used here. Average Revit experience is 3.5 years. One principal told me we're only using Revit to generate paper deliverables then they send the model to everyone. I've been driving an effort to educate the seniors who have no familiarity with any AIA digital practice document or BIM in general. Slow progress.

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    Member DavidLarson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingjosiah View Post
    I typically run the opposite direction from manufacturer created Revit content and always build my own (including cabinets), but if you need something in a pinch, you might want to check out the millwork families from the Woodwork Institute. They have a bunch of revit content based on the WI Design Series.

    https://woodworkinstitute.com/archit...design-series/

    Jon
    Thanks for linking that. It looks useful

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