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Thread: First Revit Project

  1. #1
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    First Revit Project

    Ok, so over the past year I've been teaching myself Revit and Revit Structure via tutorial videos, books (Mastering Revit xxxx series) and of course, this forum. I'm a Structural Engineer and now I finally have the opportunity to apply what I've learned to an actual project. I've learned to create projects from scratch in both programs but what is now glaringly obvious is that I have no idea where to start when given an architects model. What is your (or the industry standard) for taking an architects model and performing the necessary tasks to adding the structural elements.

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    Moderator LeanneZ's Avatar
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    If I'm given an architect's model as a .rvt file, I start a new Revit Structure project (which is where I add my structural elements) and attach the model to mine. Similar to an xref in AutoCAD.
    In your RST model, go to the Insert Tab > Link Panel > Link Revit tool... browse through to find the Architectural model. Typically, for positioning, I choose "Auto - Origin to Origin," then click <Open>

    Once the model is inserted (also known as "linked") I pin the model so it doesn't accidentally get dragged. Click the Architectural link; automatically, the "Modify| Revit Links" Tab becomes active. On the Modify Panel, find the Pin tool (or type PN.)

    Once linked and pinned, it's at your discretion to (...sorry, got called to an unexpected meeting...) to use or copy/monitor their grids. I would definitely copy/monitor their levels, though.

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    Moderator snowyweston's Avatar
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    Leanne can be excused for not welcoming you to the forum Revitard, she's clearly busy....

    Welcome!

    What Leanne could spare you in her rush is all sound advice - but I'll add my 2pence if I can.

    First, you want to establish if your architect's model has been setup with correct world coordinates - ask them - and if it has, and they'd have you emulate that - after linking, the first thing you'll want to do is acquire the shared coordinates (Manage Tab, Project Location, Coordinates, Acquire...) that way then your model will link back into theirs perfectly when you send it to them, and theirs back into yours when they update their model.

    Next, if you're worksharing your model, your link should be set to a workset of it's own - sometimes you're simply not going to want to work with the architect's model, so putting it on it's own workset allows you and your fellow Reviteers to "demand load" the link when opening your model each day.

    After that, then yes, it is entirely up to your discretion. If the architect is contro11ing the project-wide grid and levels you may wish to use the copy/monitor those elements.... you may want a grid of your own (it's not unknown) and simply want to visually reference theirs, in which case no need to duplicate theirs. The same applies to levels - and I know you RST guys like to have a few more levels than we do so you can build better flexibility into your elements, so I'd set to planning that out if I were you.

    Next (on my agenda) would be to do a bit inhouse admin. In no particular order :
    • Set up scope boxes to define your project zones (your architect may have already discussed with you zoning for on-sheet documentation, but if not open that up for discussion.
    • Setup standard views and sheets
    • Setup view templates for your views, that "reach" into architectural model categories to turn on/off what you want to see (in issue views) and what you will want to hide/show/colour/highlight in any working views you might want to have
    • etc


    I would then, and only then start to look at the actual task of developing a model. You may be assuming control over elements indicatively modelled already by the architect, and they may want rid of said elements from their model, or they want you to follow their lead - so you may end up modelling yours "on top of theirs" and needing to filter out those "repeated" items from your views... etc... etc....

    In essence it all comes down to talking first and foremost. Establish what you need to do, and how you would like to do it, then take that to your architect and discuss with them how they'll accomodate that within their work, and how you can accomodate theirs - there's a fair amount of give and take to be one, so it's best to get it all mapped out before you set off too far down the wrong path.

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    Ok, I really appreciate the above feedback. I got through the modeling phase and now I'm creating sheet sets. This projects is an apartment complex with 4 building types and a clubhouse. The client asked us to put all of the buildings in the same model. All the building are in a row and the levels are the same for each building. Worked fine except that now when I want to create sheets for each building. For instance, when I put the sheet together for bldg 1 foundation, it works great. When I tried to put the sheet together for bldg 2 foundation (same level), the foundation "level" is no longer available on the Views list. Unlike autocad, Revit does not allow us to crop/resize the viewport. Any suggestions on how to go about this?

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    Moderator LeanneZ's Avatar
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    Look into creating Dependent Views.

    On the "overall" plans, right click and choose Duplicate View > Duplicate as Dependent. Now you have your overall Parent view and all the Child Views. On the Child views, you can turn on the Crop View and stretch it to encompass each building. Then you can put each Child view on their own sheets.
    dzatto likes this.

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    Thank you, LeanneZ!!!

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    Moderator cellophane's Avatar
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    Scope Boxes will also help quite a bit. Assign the box to your view(s) and all views with that scope box crop to the extents defined.

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    Moderator snowyweston's Avatar
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    One thing to add (again) to Leanne's great suggestion; if you're going to use dependants, use the "parent" view to work in, don't switch in and out of the "child" views, it makes life a lot easier.... BUT factor also, you may want the whole plan at a large scale, and the cropped plans at another scale - again, dependants work fine for this, but you will need a second plan for that larger scale - and you may want to reference those smaller plans in that plan - in which case, look to use callouts to create them instead.

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