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Thread: Site Plan best practices

  1. #1
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    Site Plan best practices

    I am curious as to how everybody goes about creating site plans in Revit. We've been doing all our projects in Revit for about a year now, but most of them have been renovations that didn't require much in the way of site work. Now we are working on our first new construction project with a lot of site work and I'm curious as to how everyone else goes about this.

    At this point, I've just been showing everything (curbs, roadways, sidewalks, etc.) as model lines. This has worked fine for dimensioning and allows me to create callouts for enlarged views, but I'm running into a problem with keynoting. I had forgotten that you can't add keynotes to lines. (I started a thread last year about keynoting lines which got pretty intense). In the old post the debate was about whether interior items to be demolished (like millwork) need to be fully modeled or not. In this current case, surely people are not modeling every curb/gutter and sidewalk in 3d?

    Also in the old post someone mentioned using line based detail components instead of model or detail lines. This would work except that a lot of our site work is curved and as far as I know there's no way to do that.

    As I've been experimenting around with this, I've noticed that lines drawn in an In-Place mass can be keynoted. Is this a good idea or am I creating more trouble for myself down the road?

    Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

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    Moderator cellophane's Avatar
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    There was some talk here about parking & sitework: NOOB parking lot workaround spaghetti

    You can also look into adaptive components but I haven't quite figured them out yet so someone else would have to help with that.

    I think there are a few other site threads floating around - I'll try to look in a bit for them.

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    Honestly, I still do my sites in ACAD for that same reason. I don't want or need to model every curb and gutter. However, I do model it all for my renderings. I just link the ACAD site in and model over it.

    Just like the thread Chad linked to, I use floors for my flat work. You can either make a slab edge for the curb, or you can make in place extrusions using the pick line tool. I created a simple profile for my curbs. The grass can be in place extrusions or floors again. The only reason I use floors is for the slab edges, and you can edit the floors to slope them.

    Another thing I do is I make a separate file for my site work and entourage. I link my architectural model into it. This way, the site stuff isn't mucking up my architectural views. I don't have to worry about turning off stuff in my VG.

    I'm sure there's probably better ways to do it, though. I'm only doing it for rendering, not for CD's.
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    I personaly was used to split site file and building file. Thus having better control over site plan and could call back some site plan view in multiple building plans.
    Revit is far from being able to design sites but if you're just making a PAD it's ok.
    I remerber havin two really sloped site with huge buildings on it; multiple level, strong site and landmark work. Man that was just impossible or so time consuming that i was discouraged and get back to 2D.
    I can understand site is a hard functionality to implement in revit, but as far has i'm used to work site always drive in some way conception and as far has i know big buildings usually got lot of external sitework. Try to make path, stairs, tree plantation, and then try to get them looking the way you want and you'll get mad.

    My dream would be:
    modelize context (site, tree, roads) > Integrate urban rules (in plan and volumes) and context rules (Visual mask, nice point of view, neighbour visibility) > Schedule building program that are converted to small cubic mass form depending their data (surface, volume, enlightment, ...) > Sketch mass form of your project (check catia natural sketch demo to get an idea of what i mean) > Then go for it on revit from this stage revit can handle it (just add some site tools)
    Last edited by cyberjuls; May 25th, 2012 at 10:48 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dzatto View Post
    Honestly, I still do my sites in ACAD for that same reason. I don't want or need to model every curb and gutter. However, I do model it all for my renderings. I just link the ACAD site in and model over it.

    Just like the thread Chad linked to, I use floors for my flat work. You can either make a slab edge for the curb, or you can make in place extrusions using the pick line tool. I created a simple profile for my curbs. The grass can be in place extrusions or floors again. The only reason I use floors is for the slab edges, and you can edit the floors to slope them.

    Another thing I do is I make a separate file for my site work and entourage. I link my architectural model into it. This way, the site stuff isn't mucking up my architectural views. I don't have to worry about turning off stuff in my VG.

    I'm sure there's probably better ways to do it, though. I'm only doing it for rendering, not for CD's.
    We're just getting started on our first project and this was one of the first questions to be asked: "do we have to do the site in Revit?" (They're still not thrilled with the extra time figuring out how to work with the program.) My answer was 'no', thinking I wouldn't need to do anything with that in Revit - after all, we're not really doing any site work with these cabin remodels. Then I realized they would want to show the grade lines in elevation. So I had to do a toposurface anyway . . . oh, well. Still not planning to actually produce a site plan in Revit, but we'll see.

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    CADIva............from AUGI??? I remember you! Welcome to RFo.

    Sounds like you're about to be RevitDiva. Let us know if you have any questions, we'll hook you up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dzatto View Post
    CADIva............from AUGI??? I remember you! Welcome to RFo.

    Sounds like you're about to be RevitDiva. Let us know if you have any questions, we'll hook you up.
    Aww, schucks! I'm impressed you recognized me, but then again it's not that far from CAtDiva (AUGI) to CADiva.

    And thanks for the welcome - I'll admit it's nice to see a familiar "face" 'round here. Hope fully you can save me from too much of this:.

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    I'll do my best. I'm getting pretty good at this Revit stuff. If I can't answer a question, I know someone who can!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dzatto View Post
    I'll do my best. I'm getting pretty good at this Revit stuff. If I can't answer a question, I know someone who can!
    This forum is full of wisdom and greatest minds, best Revit place around for sure.
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  10. #10
    Moderator cellophane's Avatar
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    if you have a civil file already it's not too hard to get a reasonable site model done quickly. after a little practice it will take longer to clean up the civil drawing than it will to model everything in Revit. depending on the level of detail you need and integration with other disciplines it may be faster to re-create the topo in a new CAD file.

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